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2

IANAL. Technically, it's not a copyright issue, but a trademark issue. You don't have a copyright in one word, like a name. I recently read a book that has a character named "John". Does that mean no one else is allowed to use the name "John" for characters in their books, or for the names of real children? Obviously not. But you can have a trademark in a ...


3

Character names in a book or story cannot be specifically copyrighted, so that in itself is not an issue. Having said that, though, if a character is "fully delineated" and well-defined, then that in itself is enough to warrant that the character himself IS included under the copyright protection of the author, and his name or likeness could not be used ...


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As others have already stated, there is no copyright or patent in ideas only in the expression of those ideas. For example, Romeo and Juliet has probably been written and re-written a thousand times since Shakespeare wrote the original play. Think about West Side Story: that is essentially the updating and retelling of a very old tale. So long as how you ...


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Ideas are not protected by copyright. In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work. (Copyright Law of the United States of ...


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In short its about IP. In academia if someone does not contribute enough to the idea itself to be an coauthor then there is no question as to the legitimacy of the grade given to the work. The person who helps you organise your dissertation into a presetable format is not making any intellectual contribution to the work itself. I used something like a ...


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Actually, nothing. In non-fiction, as soon as you take anything from some other text – even your own! – you must enclose it in quotation marks, to show that it is a quotation, and give its source, even if you quote only a single word: When Stuart (1963) speaks of a "raise", it is obvious that ... In fiction, there are no clear conventions for this. ...



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