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Technically, the name "Star Trek" is not and cannot be copyrighted. It is "trademarked", which legally is an entirely different thing. A "copyright" protects the exact words or images used in a published work. You cannot take a copy of, say, "Lord of the Rings", put your own name on as the author, and publish it. But you certainly can write your own fantasy ...


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Instead of wasting your time trying to understand how much you can take from other works and get away with it, you might want to rather invest that time into coming up with your own ideas and fleshing them out. Every idea anyone has ever had on this Earth is influences by everything that the person having that idea has read, seen and experienced. So, in ...


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You may have to research your specific term to see how far back it goes and if you can find the first or earliest instance(s). Depending on what you're looking for, you may have to go to physical libraries rather than just the Internet. Star Trek is obviously a TV show, so the origin can be easily pinpointed. Most of the proper names on the show you can ...


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From a copyright point of view to take advantage of fair use to the maximum you could have every line that the character speaks include a quote from his favorite show and probably be fine. Annoying, but fine. This would be transformative use, namely that the quotes are changed by their context to the extent that they no longer serve their original function. ...


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This idea was used in a TV show called "John Doe", but I don't remember in which episode it was. wikipedia link


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You should be safe on legal footing, assuming that the copyrights were not assigned to your clients or that you don't have contractual obligations to request permission from the clients to use these works.


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I would only think that the trademark rule would apply if the character's name was imperative to the plot of the story. For example, if someone were to write a novel about the comic book character "The Flash."


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Technically, you own all of the content you post on Facebook; therefore, you can copyright it. HOWEVER, by posting something on Facebook you: ...grant [Facebook] a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on... Facebook. and while this license ends when you delete the content from ...


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1 Copyright A speech, if delivered to a limited audience such as an auditorium, may fall under copyright law. For example, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s, famous speech "I have a dream", which he delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., was not considered a "general publication" by a US court, and King therefore did not forfeit his ...


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Disclaimer 1: I am not a lawyer, but I've done enough writing that I've had to research copyright law. Disclaimer 2: My research has been of U.S. law, and not Canadian. The legal systems of the two countries are similar, and copyright is mostly governed by international treaties so they should be similar, but I cannot assure you that they're the same here. ...


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Ditto What: I have never read anything by Veronica Roth, but if you're writing a story that is similar to her books, AND the characters have the same names, then yes, that looks like you're copying. If the story is nothing at all the same, if her books are "young adult dystopia" (as What indicates) and yours are historical romances for senior citizens, the ...


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If your book is dissimilar enough from Roth's that it does not remind readers of her series, there is no problem if you use the same name. Her's wasn't the first time that name has been used in fiction, either. If on the other hand you are writing a Young Adult dystopia where teens have to undergo life or death trials and fight the rulers, you might want to ...


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A detailed article by io9 treats this topic. The key points: Yes, Ian Fleming's James Bond is in the public domain in Canada. Copyright law in Canada is life plus 50 years, and that applies to Ian Fleming's own works. Derivative works, such as the James Bond movies, are not public domain. Their copyright rules start counting from their date of production, ...


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I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. First, check any license terms that accompany Company S's documentation. They might have published it with the intention that other vendors will incorporate it (e.g. some Apache platforms), or they might not intend that but allow it under their license (e.g. Stack Exchange, or anything else that uses the ...


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This is a legal issue. Specifically, a copyright issue. Assuming we are talking about the United States, company S owns the copyright to their documentation. It is illegal for company M or anyone else to incorporate company S's documentation into their own without obtaining the right to do so from company S. Consult an attorney. Also, take a look at The ...


3

As I am not familiar with Canadian copyright law at all, I will answer from a US-specific basis. Firstly, copyright may not apply to his speech at all as it was a public performance and not a fixed expression. Also, if you assume that copyright does apply to his speech, this may have no bearing on your notes since ideas are not copyrightable, just their ...


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You don't even have to cite the song (although there is nothing wrong with doing so) as long as you cite the movie. This is handy as sometimes identifying the song can be a challenge. The true difficulty is (as in all fair use cases) being clear that it is a fair use. In your particular case since you may wish to quote the entire song to illustrate your ...


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If this is classified information and you only know about it because you have a high-level security clearance, than publishing the information in any form could put you in danger of criminal charges. But assuming that this is publicly available information, so that there's no issue of espionage or treason charges, and you're just thinking about copyright or ...



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