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1

I'm also not a lawyer, and neither am I in the U.S. but I'll try a swing at this... The author of a derivative work (fanfic) certainly can register their copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office. The author is expected to only claim copyright on their original contributions; any other claim would be void. Only the separable, original parts can be ...


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Adding to the answer by @laurenipsum: Her answer applies also to an original that is out of copyright. For example, anybody can make any story they want using the original characters and setting from Les Miserables, since that is out of copyright. The writers of Les Miz can't sue you for that (well, not successfully). But, if you use characters original ...


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The reason your method works is that most people who make legally questionable threats are trying to scare you with their own fears. When you shine a light on something that scares them, they back off. This does not make your counter threat any more valid than theirs. It also does not work on people who are knowledgeable or not afraid of suit, except when ...


2

It does open a slight loophole, but it is a small one. Let's say Alice writes an article and puts it on a website and explicitly licences it under a licence that allows copying but not sales. Bob finds the article and thinks everyone should read it so he prints out a bunch of copies and goes down to the corner and starts handing them out. This is legal per ...


2

I am not a lawyer, but it seems to me that, in the US, for books, the First-Sale doctrine allows the legitimate owner of a legitimate copy of a book to re-sell, lend, or rent that book. It is under this doctrine that libraries operate, for example. There are exceptions to this doctrine, for example, it appears to be illegal to rent audio recordings, but as ...


4

The answer will depend on the laws of your country. In general, the rights of the sender for privacy etc. have to be weighed against the public's need to know. Private communication is private and in most cases must not be published, because otherwise the personality rights of the sender are being violated. But if that letter contains information that ...


1

Technically, the name "Star Trek" is not and cannot be copyrighted. It is "trademarked", which legally is an entirely different thing. A "copyright" protects the exact words or images used in a published work. You cannot take a copy of, say, "Lord of the Rings", put your own name on as the author, and publish it. But you certainly can write your own fantasy ...


1

Instead of wasting your time trying to understand how much you can take from other works and get away with it, you might want to rather invest that time into coming up with your own ideas and fleshing them out. Every idea anyone has ever had on this Earth is influences by everything that the person having that idea has read, seen and experienced. So, in ...


2

You may have to research your specific term to see how far back it goes and if you can find the first or earliest instance(s). Depending on what you're looking for, you may have to go to physical libraries rather than just the Internet. Star Trek is obviously a TV show, so the origin can be easily pinpointed. Most of the proper names on the show you can ...


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From a copyright point of view to take advantage of fair use to the maximum you could have every line that the character speaks include a quote from his favorite show and probably be fine. Annoying, but fine. This would be transformative use, namely that the quotes are changed by their context to the extent that they no longer serve their original function. ...


0

This idea was used in a TV show called "John Doe", but I don't remember in which episode it was. wikipedia link


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You should be safe on legal footing, assuming that the copyrights were not assigned to your clients or that you don't have contractual obligations to request permission from the clients to use these works.


0

I would only think that the trademark rule would apply if the character's name was imperative to the plot of the story. For example, if someone were to write a novel about the comic book character "The Flash."


10

Technically, you own all of the content you post on Facebook; therefore, you can copyright it. HOWEVER, by posting something on Facebook you: ...grant [Facebook] a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on... Facebook. and while this license ends when you delete the content from ...



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