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1

This is treading on thin ice in this case. Although ideas cannot generally be copyrighted, US law does offer extra protection for a series, and the story you're a fan of is a series of stories under the conceptual umbrella of the Machine of Death. So yes, it might well be a problem if you come up your own story using the "Machine of Death" label. You ...


2

U.S. copyright law explicitly says that you do not have a copyright in an idea. There's a big international treaty about copyright so most other countries would be the same. You only own a copyright to the exact words, pictures, or other "tangible expression" of an idea. If you're not copying someone else's exact words (or pictures or music or whatever), ...


5

Concepts are not copyrightable. However, unusual similarities in story, characters, plotline, accidental or otherwise, can form the basis for a copyright infringement claim. This usually only comes up when the claimant can demonstrate economic harm or is protecting valuable IP.


1

Shakespeare's plays are in the public domain. For more recent works, such as works produced in the past 100 years, check the copyright laws of the country where you plan to publish your works and consult a lawyer. To gain background in this area, I recommend reading the Wikipedia articles on Copyright and International copyright treaties.


1

Legally, in the US or the UK or countries with a similar legal tradition, the older the quote, the more famous the person quoted, and the more famous the quote itself, the safer you are. Quotations from works that are centuries old, as well as very famous quotes from the modern era, are held to have passed into the public domain. If you have specific reason ...


1

You might have to consult a lawyer, but from my time as a newspaper editor, I recall that (in the 1990s) BOOK TITLES WERE NOT SUBJECT TO COPYRIGHT. So long as you are not "attempting to trade upon the prestige of the earlier work by that title," (or words to that effect) you are okay. That means, in "real language," that so long as your ms. does not ...


4

In this case, there's not likely to be a problem if you give your novel the same title as a Czech essay. You're not trying to confuse anyone, and intelligent people are unlikely to be confused by it. The protection given to a title is complicated. People sometimes say "You can't protect a title," but this is not true. Some titles can be registered as ...


0

If you're using a title already used before, you should check out how popular that book was. If it was, then you should probably change it. Chances are that it might still be fresh in peoples' memories. Each book title should be as unique as possible. However, if the previous book was not so well known and is deeply buried in the mists of time, then you can ...


3

I worked in bookstores for 10 years and libraries for five. You have no idea how often someone asks for a title that seems unique, but two or even three hits come up. It's even worse when it's a single word title. I'd check and see what the other book is about. If the subject matter is too similar and its recently published, it might cause confusion. But ...


3

Titles cannot be copyrighted or trademarked. Yes, “Star Wars” is trademarked, but not because of the book or movie. It is the toys and other goods that enable the trademark. So you should go ahead and use your title.


14

If you think the title is the best fit for your novel, you should keep it. There are many novels with the same name in the market, which makes it a little hard to find a novel with smaller market presence written by unknown author. Thus why, it is only a problem if the novel you're writing has the same name with another novel written by an author with more ...



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