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In general, the form or medium or location in which you keep your writing has nothing to do with your copyright. Whether you write documents with a pencil and keep them in a drawer or save them electronically on your personal computer or on the Internet or chisel them into stone tablets and hide them in a cave, your copyright rights are the same. If you ...


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Google Drive's terms state: “You retain ownership of any intellectual property rights that you hold in that content. In short, what belongs to you stays yours.” https://support.google.com/docs/answer/2733115


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Any writing that you make available to the general public (whether anyone reads it or not) is published. That will prevent you from selling various "first" rights, which is what publishers typically want. If you haven't made it public, don't worry about it. Google Drive is just storage. As for the notes... You own the copyright to those, too, but those are ...


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Legally, in the US that page is unnecessary. Since April 1 1989 the copyright notice has become obsolete in the US and you no longer need to register your copyright. You automatically own the copyright in your work upon creation. Today, the sole purpose of the copyright notice is to tell anyone interested in using your content who they need to contact to ...


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Are you asking simply about the copyright statement, or about all that stuff that gets put on the copyright page? If you're just worried about the copyright statement: Put "Copyright 2015 by Fred Smith", filling in whatever the year is that you first publish your book, and your name. It is a very good idea to register your copyright. As you said you are ...


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First: I am not a lawyer. Purchase a copy of the indispensable The Copyright Handbook. It is very readable and very informative. On my copyright information pages, I include four kinds of information: Publication info Copyright notices Warning statement Fiction disclaimer Publication Info I list these items, which identify the publication and ...


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If you're self-publishing and not doing it through a company, use your real name: "Copyright (C) 2015 John Doe". Under the Berne Convention (which applies in most countries), you own the copyright from the moment of creation until you assign it away. You have no need to assign it away, so you don't need a company there. You could set up a ...


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For something to be "defamatory," it has to be 1) certifiably "untrue" and 2) "highly offensive" to a reasonable person. What you said is more of an opinion than a factual statement, you are entitled to your opinion and said nothing that was certifiably untrue. Moreover, what you said would not be "highly offensive" to a reasonable person.


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There is no problem in using public places in your books, including the Moscow Metro. In fact the Moscow Metro is already the setting of the Metro-series of novels by russian author Dmitry Glukhovsky. No problem here.


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The Moscow Metro is public transport so fair game to use in a story. For any unfounded negative remarks, in case you are worried about consequences your can use a disclaimer thought that generally only is done for real live persons (that may take actions otherwise).


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Yes. No.        


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Can you ask someone at the advertising company you worked for? Surely they know who owns the copyrights, and can give you their contact information. You do not want to get sued by a big company, so you'd better check up to make sure. Anything produced in your lifetime is still under copyright unless it was formally released into the public domain, which ...



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