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I am not a lawyer, so please get competent legal counsel if other measures do not suffice. What you are doing probably falls under the heading of "fair use," (for criticism), which is a defense against copyright infringement. Nevertheless, it would be wise to approach the copyright holder, and get their "blessing" (or at least acquiescence) to your own work....


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You are worrying about the wrong thing. No one wants to steal your stuff. Unpublished fiction on the web is of zero commercial value. There are far more people writing it than there are reading it. The only people who should worry about being plagiarized are successful authors who are, first, making money, and, second, have a fanbase of people who admire ...


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Apart from a book being re-published by different publishers, a book can also be published by two or more co-publishers. Here is an example, showing different citation styles: APA Martínez, F. G., & Tigchelaar, E. J. C. (Eds.). (1997-1998). The dead sea scrolls: Study edition (Vols. 1-2). Leiden: Brill. MLA Martínez, F. G., and Eibert J. C. ...


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Actually it doesn't even need to be copyrighted to give you trouble. A copyright is just the formally asserted right to something - a phrase in this case. You can be sued without a copyright, a copyright just makes the suing position stronger. Just look at the Red Hot Chili Peppers lawsuit against the TV Series Californication (https://en.wikipedia.org/...


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Music lyrics are "poems," and are therefore copyrightable independent of music. That makes it invalid to say that "the main part of a song is its music rather than lyrics." There's little or no truth to that argument, and even if there was, it would not prevent lyrics from being copyrighted.


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I am not a lawyer but here's my "take." The writer will get sued for doing the actual infringing. The publisher will also get sued, for aiding and abetting, and because it has the deeper pockets. The publisher may have a defense if it took steps to prevent infringement such as questioning the author about the antecedents of his work, and/or doing a ...


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"Signed, sealed, and delivered" is a standard phrase used in everyday life. As such, it cannot be copyrighted. For something to be copyrighted, it needs to be an original expression of an idea, as opposed to an idea itself. This phrase is too "standard" (and too short) to qualify.


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I believe that phrase comes from the United States Postal Service...as if to say "I'm as right as the mail." An example I have used is "Games without Frontiers" (in French) as was used in the title sequence of the song by Peter Gabriel. This was an academic work but I was given no grief for it as the expression was considered part of the "public domain" as ...


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Short phrases like that can't usually be copyrighted. The link is from the US government, but I believe it to be the same for most of the Berne Convention countries. Of course you should consult your local law on this. In this specific case, there's already a TV show by that name, so they apparently didn't run into trouble either. If you use the phrase ...


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I'm not a lawyer, but I'll point you in a direction you may want to go. What you are doing sounds like something called "parody." It turns out that "parody" is one of the so-called "fair use" defenses for copying. More to the point, John Adams is not alive to sue you, and no one else can, on his behalf. In your case, you should "make a virtue of necessity" ...


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I am now going to try to answer this question based on what I've learned since our December exchange. I have "taste-tested" both books without reading through either. The styles are different enough that I'm going to assume that Stephen Fry didn't plagiarize any of Dumas book in the usual sense of "copying" one or more passages. There is a doctrine called "...



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