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58

Short, forceful, sentences are clear and pleasant to read. Long sentences (full of description and unnecessary circumlocution), while capable of containing more information than a much shorter sentence, have a tendency to indulge in bad habits like the passive voice, and oftimes the reader, upon reaching the end of a monstrously long and verbose sentence, ...


25

Complex, long sentences are less common in modern English than in modern German, or in the English of a century ago, or in Latin. Most style guides agree that a sentence that one has to read twice in order to understand it is inferior to rephrasing the same such that one may understand it in one read. (Did you enjoy reading the previous sentence? I think it ...


9

It's hard to opine on this without some examples of the sentences you wrote. But generally, you shouldn't write complex sentences just because you can do it well. When a particular idea really requires a complex sentence in order to be conveyed accurately and fully, then I see no problem with it. But this is rarely the case. I can't tell you how many ...


8

Capitals in English are used for proper nouns. Your two examples have slightly different shades of meaning. One of my favorite subjects was Computational Geometry. I read that as "One of my favorite subjects was Math 247, the specific course entitled 'Computational Geometry,' taught by Professor Angleton." One of my favorite subjects was computational ...


7

Publish online. Start an anonymous blog, and if you're really worried about your name getting out, see what you can do about uploading from public computers. If you really don't care about personal rewards and only want the work to be out there, the internet is a good outlet. Granted, that doesn't guarantee it will be read, and considering you're going to ...


6

Publish under a pseudonym. In addition, you might want to consider targeting a market other than your own community. If your country does not approve of literature on certain topics, it may be difficult to find an audience willing to read your work. Aim for foreign markets.


5

Recode as science fiction. Dune was about the battles over a large deserted area in which were the largest (in fact sole) deposits of a resource vital to the transportation logistics of an entire civilisation. There are many people who love that series that still don't get the relevance. In fact almost everything that could be considered science fiction is ...


4

You are hitting an interesting question here. I am a native French speaker and I struggled with the same issue when I learnt English. My English writing used to reflect my French upbringing. It is considered a skill to be able to craft long, complex sentences in French, using encapsulations and appositions. Fortunately enough, my English teacher explained ...


4

Probably not that complicated (in theory) when you write it in a story. The problematic part is the music, rhythm, which lulls the baby. These must not be stirring, but the words are not understood by the youngest babies. Humming is enough for them. That's easy to describe. Older kids understand the lyric though. But finding something gentle should be easy ...


4

I think the problem with long sentences is not length per se, but poor construction. A well-written long sentence carries you along with it, and is a joy to read. Consider this long sentence, the opening line of John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany: I am doomed to remember a boy with a wrecked voice—not because of his voice, or because he was the ...


3

I've done a fair bit of tech writing and would put a lot of effort into writing simple, short sentences devoid of ambiguity and profligacy. I am currently reading a Richard Ford novel (The Sportswriter) and it is the total opposite. The sentences twist and turn, they infuse exposition in the descriptions, feelings in the narrative and vary the sentence ...


2

In Israel (where I live in), I cannot think of any "unchallangeable taboos" (other than Pedophelia or something along those lines) that will prevent me from writing. If I wanted to write something while making sure I will not suffer any consequences, I will probably be using a different name, avoiding any issues with my locality. Nobody has to know you ...


2

This depends a lot on the preferences of the individual reader, editor, or teacher. There is nothing inherently wrong with long, elaborate sentences in English, and many of the best writers in English are known for using sentences of this type. However, the more complex your sentence is, the more difficult it will be for others to understand. Therefore it ...


2

Read Hemingway. Then read Henry James. These are both considered great English writers, so presumably both have acceptable writing styles. I looked at the first paragraph of two of their most famous stories, and extracted the first two sentences of each. Compare. James: The story had held us, round the fire, sufficiently breathless, but except the ...


2

I have the same problem! I knew a lullaby was (duh) lulling, and so I wrote down a list of all the words I could think of that had a sleepy connotation. Then I just kind of arranged them in a nonsensical but very rhythmic way. Maybe the process I used would work for you too.


2

After it's written, and you're polishing, think about vowel sounds. There should be very few words or lines which end on hard consonants (K, T) because you want the sounds and the lines to flow in a stream. Say your lines aloud in a singsong (never mind a melody) to make sure they can be sung, and you haven't picked a word which stops on a voiceless ...


2

I have three children, and just before each child's birth I wrote a lullaby that was just for that child. Each one has a different tune and a different lyrical pattern, but the one thing they have in common is that they can be sung softly in a low voice. The whole point of a lullaby is to lull the child to sleep. In most cases, the words to a lullaby ...


1

I just want to recommend a really amazing book that addresses this fear (among every other kind of fear writers feel throughout the entire process from blank page to published work): The Courage to Write: How Writers Transcend Fear


1

In Germany, hate speech (particularly Nazism), and the production of pro-hate materials is illegal. In many areas of the world (especially Africa and the Middle East), pro-homosexual or pro-LGBT sentiment is heavily frowned upon or outright illegal.



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