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10

This is called a "simultaneous submission," and a well-organized contest should have a clear-cut rule on whether or not they're allowed. If a particular contest doesn't call simultaneous submissions out specifically, the safest is to try and contact them and make sure what their rules are. At very least, be absolutely certain you can contact them and ...


8

Writers of the Future is for SF/F, but it's the longest-running contest in the genre, and carries significant fame and prestige. No other contest comes close. WotF is specifically for unpublished writers, and occurs once a quarter. Check the website for entrance dates and other information.


6

It very much depends on the quality of the contest, and that depends in turn on the quality of the judges and whether they provide any sort of feedback to the authors. "Did I win or not?" is pretty crude measure of quality. I was at the Writers of the Future awards ceremony recently here in Los Angeles, and I was struck by the fact that every winner ...


4

I see two separate paths you can take: 1) You might have to back up and set down some rules for the writing before developing rules for the judging. For example, if one of your judging rules is "The story must have a beginning, middle, and end," but someone submits an amazing in medias res piece, is that going to be penalized for not meeting an arbitrary ...


3

Not usually, in my experience, and the reason why is that they are usually judged by objective standards with an objective set of criteria and you're really only going to win the kind of contest with those kinds of guidelines if you tailor your writing to what the judges are going to be looking for. With this in mind, when you submit to that kind of a ...


2

There is a "Contests & Awards" section in the Writer's Market book that is published every year. There are several essay contests in the Non-Fiction category in that section. For a much bigger list, you can do a Google search for essay contest or the like. Be sure to click "More Search Tools" and choose to limit the search to within the Last Year so ...


2

You are on the right track. Your topic sounds promising, giving a starting sentence and a picture should help inexperienced (teenage) writers to start writing at least something. But to avoid writers block, you should give them a little choice (not too much, because that blocking again). If you give them three different topics, or three different pictures, ...


2

I think for a writing competition, you need a theme or focus, and maybe - for that age - some guidelines. Are you after an imaginative story, or a factual-type report of a fictional situation, or is there a setting it should take place in? You then have something against which you can judge them subjectively, as to how well they have interpreted the brief, ...


1

Join a writer's centre in your city/homestate if you can. They have lots of advice and information on competitions that you can enter your work in. A few years ago I did a lot of legwork myself to learn about this process, and it worked really well. Also attend workshops/classes where you often learn from professionals and meet other like-minded souls.


1

Joining other local writers, as Amanda Witt said, is great. There are also online databases and sites that will help you locate contests and markets, and even provide statistics on those contests. https://duotrope.com includes info on poetry and essay markets, although it has recently made much of the info available only to subscribers (only $5 a month). ...



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