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16

One of the best books you can read on the subject is Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. The book itself is written as a comic, so it can illustrate the techniques it discusses. One of the topics covered is word-picture dynamics, which seems pretty close to what you're looking for.


7

Are you really looking for a collaborator, or just someone to illustrate your vision? That can affect how you search. Sometimes I hire illustrators and I have something very, very specific in mind that I simply want executed. Other times, I have a general guide and I want them to put their own spin on it and give me options, come up with ideas. Being clear ...


6

A comic -- web or paper, cartoon strip or sophisticated graphic novel -- is a different medium from conventional written stories. The biggest difference is that it's hard to do exposition; those long explanatory passages that you could slip into a novel don't fit into a few panels. It's also hard to convey nuances like meaningful gazes. So think about the ...


5

Two approaches to researching existing cities without travelling there: Read about that city. A lot has been written about New York, from travel journals to biographies to history books to fiction to science fiction to politics to newspaper articles. Everything about New York has been written down somewhere, including the smells. While New York is ...


5

The simplest answer is that there has to be something which bridges the divide between master and slave and allows them to see and respect one another as equals. Does she show mercy to the slave whom her slave has defeated? Does he disable rather than kill his opponents, or dispatch them quickly and without pain? Did she acquire him and thereby save him from ...


5

It's been a while since I've looked into comic scrips, but here's what I remember. There are a lot of differences between a script for a Movie/TV, a stage play and a comic. The biggest one is that in a comic there isn't a director (though the author or artist can fill that role depending on how you work together). In a movie the majority of the camera work ...


5

Comic scripts usually include dialogue and location/background descriptions, maybe some directions for character placement. Movie scripts focus more on these details, and add elements of staging, camera placement and angles, and may have guidelines for post-production sound and visual effects. The biggest challenge is thinking of how to visualize how a scene ...


5

In nearly all cases where you're writing a webcomic, you are going to want a true collaborator. Comics are a visual storytelling medium, as evidenced by the fact that you can have a comic that has pictures but no text, but you can't really have a comic that is text without pictures. This person is going to be helping you to tell your story and should ideally ...


3

Scott McCloud is a good starting point in terms of understanding the potential of what comics as a hybrid medium can accomplish. That being said, in response to your interest in writing, as opposed to drawing or inking, I would recommend: The DC Comics Guide to Writing - Dennis O'Neil Alan Moore's Writing for Comics - Alan Moore Both provide interesting ...


2

As with any other application of "writing", it's recommended to read voraciously. The more I think about it, the more I think that reading is at least as important as practice. So... you do love comics? Have a large comic collection? Or at least read lots and lots of (different style/genre preferably) comics? Know whatever genre you want to do in your ...


2

scene (notes to the illustrator) action (notes to the illustrator) dialog You know, this sounds like a script, so write a script, nothing more, nothing less.


2

Joe Sacco, an excellent comic artist (printed, not web), does sometimes do “illustrated narrative” comics, where there’s quite a bit of writing in narrative form, not dialogue, but the illustration still dominates (so it’s still a comic, not an illustrated novel). You have to get to the fourth page of Gunnerkrigg Court before you see any dialogue. Before ...


2

"...how I can believably place a fictional city in the real United States (like replacing smaller towns, or just finding an empty stretch of coast or riverside without angering people that I've "erased" their hometown from the map)?" I think you have answered your own question. Just get out the map and look for a good site for a city, and if there isn't ...


2

With Google maps and Google street view, you can get a lot of detail about the layout of a city and just what it looks like at any given point that would have been very difficult ten or twenty years ago. That said, sure, if you set a story in a place that you have never been to, it is very likely that you will make mistakes about things that you didn't ...


1

If you do web searches on movies cities and books cities (and similar searches), you get lots of hits that you'll probably find helpful. Stuff like "Top 10 cities on film", "Cities as characters in film", "50 Coolest Fictional Cities". Also, searching for videos using travelogue CityName (e.g., travelogue "New York City") gives useful hits. The web is ...


1

Consider setting your story in a place that doesn't exist now, but exists in your mind. Do what DC and other comics do, and create a 'bit like reality but not exactly like reality now' setting that works for your story. You can create whatever place you want. If you want to have an American influence, do so. But be prepared to create your own world.


1

This is a question with no one right answer, but if I were doing this, I might consider starting the second season with Character B and continuing up to the point where he meets Character A, and then backtracking to fill in on Character A. The advantage is that Character B gets a strong solid uninterrupted block of narrative to establish himself. The ...


1

I'd say you did hit a snag indeed. With the medium. I could nicely answer this for a novel, but webcomics are inherently restricting, with need to limit verbal communication, bite-sized "strips", and so on. Still, I'll try best to my ability. First, to make things more spicy (otherwise the outcome would be mellow and boring), build a conflict between the ...


1

You need to know your characters first to be able to know how they'll react to the whole situation. Is the "Agent" a kind master, or is she a cruel bitch? If she's a bitch, is it just a façade she puts on to make herself look tough? Does she like fighters in general, or she thinks they're brainless twits? What about the "Fighter"? Is he resenting her for ...



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