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16

One of the best books you can read on the subject is Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. The book itself is written as a comic, so it can illustrate the techniques it discusses. One of the topics covered is word-picture dynamics, which seems pretty close to what you're looking for.


14

For fiction that can accommodate different POVs, dividing those up per author not only addresses this problem but can be a feature. For cases where you want a unified voice, if you can't get a tough editor like Lauren Ipsum suggested, try having the authors edit each other's sections. In technical-writing teams I've found that this drives the material ...


11

The largest communities I found are Storymash and Protagonize. The Wikipedia article on collaborative fiction mentions some other sites, too.


10

If you want to unify the voices: Get a tough editor. Explain to him/her that you have two authors and you want to standardize their voices. You might pick a passage or a chapter which particularly reflects both writers, and say "make it all sound like that." Then be prepared to have a whole chunk of everything rewritten. ETA: Examples of things which ...


8

I use git for version control, and it's terrific for writing projects. I've used GitHub to share work in progress while collaborating with a friend. We wrote plain text files in markdown format. GitHub also has an Issues tracker that can easily be used to assign, accept, and track individual tasks. My friend and I didn't need that to collaborate, but ...


7

Are you really looking for a collaborator, or just someone to illustrate your vision? That can affect how you search. Sometimes I hire illustrators and I have something very, very specific in mind that I simply want executed. Other times, I have a general guide and I want them to put their own spin on it and give me options, come up with ideas. Being clear ...


6

My own habit is to use either Dropbox or Google docs to store what I refer to as "lore files." Each file contains all current details for a particular category: cities, characters, items, species. When making a minor change, the files are changed directly. If it is a major change or addition, it is added to a discussion file, to be added later. Before ...


6

There seem to be two general approaches to this: One person writes the work, and the other starts revising it heavily. There might be significant problems that the second author needs to address. There might be significant expansion of the work. Both authors agree on a general outline or plan, and they map out the work, indicating who will write the ...


5

Another suggestion would be to use some sort of distributed source control system to keep track of the changes that you each make. Dropbox Dropbox has built in source control, so you can roll back to previous changes, and it is fairly simple to use. Their Terms of Service kind of trouble me, but I may have donned my tinfoil hat in recent years. Benefits ...


5

The first step I would suggest is to develop a timeline and then place your characters on that timeline. It would be better if each of you is writing from the perspective of a different character, because then you wouldn't have to worry so much about what the other person is writing. It would also help to periodically exchange content so that you can see ...


5

I'd stick with "we" when you have two or more authors unless it's clear that sections of the book were written by one particular author, such as in a compilation of essays. But you should ask your publisher for the final decision to save yourself pain later if they disagree with your choice.


5

In nearly all cases where you're writing a webcomic, you are going to want a true collaborator. Comics are a visual storytelling medium, as evidenced by the fact that you can have a comic that has pictures but no text, but you can't really have a comic that is text without pictures. This person is going to be helping you to tell your story and should ideally ...


5

You could start your own wiki - if you need hosting, there are plenty of resources available for cheap/free wiki hosting (PBWorks comes to mind.); you could use any of the browser-based shared document editing tools (Google Docs, Zimbra, Zoho); collaborative editing software (see this Wikipedia article for some examples).


5

I'm in agreement with John Smithers here: the issue seems to be that you don't know enough about the character, so K needs to supply as much detail as possible for you to start with. Perhaps write a questionnaire for K to answer as if you were interviewing Garlic. This is an old technique, but it could help you get answers to fundamental things you want/need ...


4

I know of a few shared world out there, some are more open then others it really depends on what sort of genre you're looking to write in. Up here in Pacific Northwest is a setting called "New Cascadia" which is one of those community sent back in time thing... though in this case it most of western Washington and Oregon. I know there is quiet a bit of ...


4

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. This is a complicated area of law, but I'll give you the 30,000 foot view to get you started. By default (at least, under U.S. law), each co-author owns an equal interest in the work's copyright. This is irrespective of how much (or how little) each co-author contributed to the work. So, absent of any agreement, if there are ...


4

If you are programmers, then why not use the same tools you use in your day job? Trello may meet your needs.


3

As mentioned previously, if two or more contributors are considered as co-authors, they share in all revenue generated from the work. The exception would be if they had signed some form of agreement beforehand that permits one of the authors to act on behalf of the other(s), but this would be a rare situation. In regards to the rights reverting to one ...


3

When your authors began working with their respective agents, they would have had to sign a contract explaining the bounds of the agency. That contract will explain the ins and outs for common situations such as dual representation, entering markets outside the agent's bailiwick, and so forth. I would be surprised if 'Collaborative Works' wasn't mentioned ...


3

I've written a few short stories with friends via email, with each person chipping in a section. It yields some interesting and fun results, but not what you'd call a particularly coherent story. For an example of how one pair of pros did it, take a look at this interview with Sean Williams and Shane Dix. Basically, they worked on a story outline together, ...


3

Several years ago I wrote a short story with a friend. We talked briefly about the premise, then started writing. One of us would write a few hundred words and hand it over to the other. The other person would edit (focusing mostly on the language), then add a few hundred words and hand it over. This process worked beautifully for us, for that short ...


3

Give each collaborator free rein to edit any part of the story for tone. After a round or two of that, you won't be able to tell who wrote what. If it's a multiple POV story, you can give each POV to one collaborator to edit for tone. That way, if tone varies, it gives each character a distinct voice.


2

John Cleese and Robyn Skynner actually used sectional speech headed: John: and Robyn: To make the distinction. But their book was dialectic with Cleese interviewing Skynner. In general co-authored books are just presumed to be co-authored with no specific division made between who wrote what. Some programming books I've read give bylines on chapters ...


2

Scott McCloud is a good starting point in terms of understanding the potential of what comics as a hybrid medium can accomplish. That being said, in response to your interest in writing, as opposed to drawing or inking, I would recommend: The DC Comics Guide to Writing - Dennis O'Neil Alan Moore's Writing for Comics - Alan Moore Both provide interesting ...


2

As with any other application of "writing", it's recommended to read voraciously. The more I think about it, the more I think that reading is at least as important as practice. So... you do love comics? Have a large comic collection? Or at least read lots and lots of (different style/genre preferably) comics? Know whatever genre you want to do in your ...


2

I recently co-wrote a book that will be published in May. It's a lot simpler than you think. The payment section of the clause says what the split is. In most cases I suppose that's 50-50 though obviously it could be anything. The other business issues in the collaboration are another matter. If you and your coauthor are splitting the money 50-50 and one ...


2

Since we never put anything out on a public server, aka Cloud, I don't know if Trelby is what you need or not. On the bright side, it's FREE, so no harm in taking a look to see. I've never heard of Plotbot, but have used Celtx. The number one screenwriting software is Final Draft. It is expensive, crashes often, and not universal among platforms. For this ...


1

write random scenes with Garlic; have K tell me what I could have done better." I would say it's the other way around. K should write a character sheet. K should write scenes which describe how the werecat acts and behaves. Then you as a reader become acquainted with the character, maybe even identify with him. And you make suggestions, how to improve ...


1

Personally, the best co-authored books I've read there was no discernable difference in styles. Occasionally, such as in the Stephen King/Peter Straub collaboration "The Talisman" it could be argued that one wrote about one world while the other wrote the other. But in your case, where the authors are very different, I would probably alternate chapters.



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