Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Usually it's the author or the author's estate/agent/descendant who holds the original copyrights, so you don't need to contact a large number of publishers, just that one entity for bulk of works. In rare cases the author might have fully sold copyrights (as opposed to licensing the publishers for release) and in these cases you will need to contact these ...


-1

You can use the asterisk '*'. For example: Text...... I have a dream *1 ....Text..... Text....Text..................Text...... So between conclusion and biography you can put a page called "references" so you can write: *1: Martin King speech


0

Don't quote quotes. Go to the original publication and quote from there. Only if that is not available to you (which is rarely believable with almost everything being available online or through interlibrary loan) may you quote from a secondary source. If you quote a quote or paraphrase, quote it verbatim. The footnote is not part of the text, so don't ...


0

I would do that as "The barn was on fire so I ran away." [13] (Citing [14]) where [13] is where you got the quote and [14] is Some Research Study. Or even "The barn was on fire1 so I ran away." [13] (Citing [14] as 1) where the 1 would be superscripted, as in the original. (Sorry, can't figure out how to do that here.) I would change the quote ...


0

The answer by Lea is wrong in APA! There are two kinds of citations: direct quotes and paraphrases. Direct quotes of less than 40 words are enclosed in quotations marks. Direct quotes of 40 words or more are set off from the surrounding text as "block quotes". Direct quotes can be several sentences, even several paragraphs long, and the source for them is ...


-1

Just once at the end of the last sentence. The only reason you would need to cite the same source twice is if you refer to it in different places in the text. If all the information from one source is sequential, you only need to cite once.


0

That looks about right to me. It might depend on the field of study and the conventions thereof. For example, as I recall, in my biology classes we were meant to cite in-text by author and year e.g. (Author et al., 2011). The bibliography, of course, will contain much more information.



Top 50 recent answers are included