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I haven't tested this (which would require registering with them and obtaining an ID), but CrossRef provides a web service that appears to do what you need. From the documentation: Crossref query: https://doi.crossref.org/servlet/query?pid=username:password&id=10.1006/jmbi.2000.4282 Like metadata queries, DOI query results are returned in ...


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Fictionalizing a philosophical/cultural concept isn't illegal, uncommon, or, in my opinion, unethical. Fictionalizing can actually help popularize a concept that might otherwise languish in obscurity. If you are fortunate to get published, you might ask to have an author's note included at the end of the book referencing the original article --I've seen ...


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Wikipedia offers citation tools that generate citations from DOIs. You might see how those tools work, and whether you can use them outside Wikipedia.


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Poet e e cummings and singer k.d. lang are both referenced in all lowercase letters. Singer Prince famously went by an unpronounceable symbol for a few years (which many wrote as The Artist Formerly Known As Prince, or TAFKAP). Many artists go by one name: singers Adele, Cher, Madonna; cartoonist Herblock; French writer Molière; British writer Saki. If you ...


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Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on ...


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You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...



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