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A citation is a pointer to a source. While a URL is technically that, when universities say "citation" they mean something following a formal citation format. A citation typically includes an author, the title of the work, a publisher, and the date of publication. A URL, on the other hand, contains none of that, and if it turns into a dead link later, the ...


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Your second option is one I have seen frequently. As an example of its use, have a look at page 19 of http://arxiv.org/abs/1501.07274, just above their equation (2.3), where they use that format of citation for a formula. (Never forget, though, that citation style is usually dictated by the journal you are submitting to. Be certain to check their ...


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You can call it a Work Cited page


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There are citation websites across the internet such as citationmachine.net and easybib.com that do this for you in multiple formats. I would suggest using them, as they make life much, much easier.



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