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1

I'm not a law librarian, so take my answer with a heap of salt. Looking at appendix 7.1 of the APA style manual it appears that you could go with example 3. Sample reference to an unreported decision: Gilliard v. Oswald, No. 76-2109 (2d Cir. Mar. 16, 1977). Explanation: The docket number and the court are provided. The opinion was announced on March ...


1

If your source of information was the YouTube video, then you cite the YouTube video. If you're using some specific style guide -- MLA or APA or whatever -- follow their format for citing a web site. If not, make up something consistent with what you're using for paper sources.


2

You (probably) don't. It is unlikely that a film made in the 1950s saw its first release on YouTube. You wouldn't cite an ebook as published on some torrent site, you wouldn't cite music as published on some file sharing site, and similarly you would not (usually) cite a film as being published on a video sharing site such as YouTube. You would give ...


0

As others have noted, you cite the source that you actually used. If A quotes or describes B, and you have read A but have not read B (whether because it's not available, you just didn't bother, or whatever), then you cite A. It is generally considered better to go to original sources. If some later writer says that Aquinas said sex with a pregnant woman ...


0

Reference the quotes AND associated conclusions to respective authors. You have two options in this case: silently agree with the author of "Commentary..." and express their opinion as your own, supporting it with quote from Thomas Aquinas, and restrict your credit to relevant parts in the original "Sentences" - likely as sourced in the "Commentary". This ...


2

Both the MLA Handbook and the APA Manual state that in academic writing you must have read what you cite. Since you cannot have read a source of which you know only a short passage quoted in another text, you must get the original, read it, and cite that. The reason is that any citation might misrepresent the original or withhold relevant information or ...


-1

Always cite the original work, even if you have to spend time finding the details like the publisher and the year. You must give the original source the credit. Only use a secondary source if you need to criticise the use of the quote. Using secondary sources can lead to tralatitious activity.


2

You cite the (or a) source that you used. If you read it in Book A and that book says it came from Book B, you cite Book A because that's your source. If you choose to follow the reference and see it in Book B yourself, then you could cite either A or B (you used both). In that kind of situation, it's generally best to cite the source that's closest to ...



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