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7

Format it the same way, with blockquote indents, and if you can add a little dialogue before and after, you don't have to worry about weird quote mark placement. Bilbo stood and cleared his throat. "I have a new poem for you all," he announced. "It goes thus:     All that is gold does not glitter,     Not all ...


7

First, two general principles: Consistency with other publications is useful. Consistency within a publication is also useful. So write a style guide that documents your house style. Your house style does not necessarily have to match the stylization of a wordmark. An acronym is an abbreviation pronounced as a word. Many publications write acronyms with ...


6

You need to differentiate between the orthographically correct representation and the typographic treatment of text. For example, a photographer by the name of Robert Smith might decide to write his name in lowercase letters, as "robert smith", both in his signature and in the wordmark representing him in letterheads, on his website and in watermarks in his ...


5

If this is not an academic publication and you are not bound by the more severe citation styles like APA or MLA, a common way to reduce distraction in popular non-fiction is to have no in-text references at all and append endnotes to the end of the text that are ordered "chronologically" and give page numbers and text snippets to identify what they relate ...


4

Retype (or use OCR) if the meaning of text is the important thing. You have your formatting rules, your publication may need to be formatted, maybe made readable for mobile devices or devices for handicapped people. If the manuscript is in graphical form, e.g. illustration with descriptions of its parts or some very special formatting, e.g. alchemical ...


4

"Private" doesn't mean just one recipient; it just means "not public". When you throw a by-invitation party in your home it's a private affair even if there are 50 people there. Email is the same way. The bigger problem here is that the person you're citing didn't write directly to you. So if you cite "Harry Q. Bovik, private communication" and somebody ...


4

In MLA citation, the author is put before the website. Lastname, Firstname. "Title." Website Title (Italics). Publisher, Date Month Year of publication. Web. Date month year of access. If there is no author, just omit the author and begin the citation with "Title.


4

The only way to avoid confusion is to put your comment outside the quote: According to the commentary the Buddha was pointing to himself when he said, "Here, Rahula, some monks live in the forest."


4

You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...


3

Consider how your reader will use the book. In an academic work (which this is not), readers: are likely to already be familiar with the cited works (they're also researchers in this field, after all) will rely on the works you cite to evaluate your work (they care about those citations) read lots of such articles and welcome a consistent style ...


3

Brackets should be used rarely and should be used only when ESSENTIAL extraneous information is necessary for reader understanding or as a necessary grammatical feature at the beginning of a quote. This is because the reader loses focus. I never finished reading your sentence my first two times through.. I would simply remove your brackets in this case. ...


2

From what I remember, the standard way to separate two citations like this would be to include the year in the citation. EG: "This is quote one" ("Alternative Energy" 2007), and "this is quote two" ("Alternative Energy" 2015). I cannot cite a source for this, though, as I have not used MLA in years and do not have a copy of the handbook available.


2

You (probably) don't. It is unlikely that a film made in the 1950s saw its first release on YouTube. You wouldn't cite an ebook as published on some torrent site, you wouldn't cite music as published on some file sharing site, and similarly you would not (usually) cite a film as being published on a video sharing site such as YouTube. You would give ...


2

Both the MLA Handbook and the APA Manual state that in academic writing you must have read what you cite. Since you cannot have read a source of which you know only a short passage quoted in another text, you must get the original, read it, and cite that. The reason is that any citation might misrepresent the original or withhold relevant information or ...


2

You cite the (or a) source that you used. If you read it in Book A and that book says it came from Book B, you cite Book A because that's your source. If you choose to follow the reference and see it in Book B yourself, then you could cite either A or B (you used both). In that kind of situation, it's generally best to cite the source that's closest to ...


2

According to this Pitts Theology Library Research Guide, The two styles most commonly used in theology are SBL and Chicago style. It is important to note that SBL style suggests that users check the Chicago Manual if a question is not specifically answered in the SBL Handbook. SBL Handbook of Style: For Ancient Near Eastern, Biblical, and Early ...


2

Most Modern Christian works use footnotes except for scripture which is always cited inline. Early works which predate modern citation styles use the author's name or the common identifier for a work when an author was known for more than one work, as many works had no titles, page numbers or publishers in a narrative citation style (the citation, what there ...


2

As Oxinabox says, if you are writing for a journal, they will almost always, if not literally always, have standards for footnotes and endnotes. Usually they'll say to follow MLA or APA or whatever style guide. Some may have their own rules. If you are writing a scholarly book, the publisher may have a specific style guide. If not, or if you are ...


2

Nursery rhymes should be formatted the same as any other poems. As a block quote, each line of poem is set on its own line, matching the formatting of the original as much as possible. (This includes indents at the start of each line, as in George Herbert's "The Altar".) No quotation marks are used. Except for the quotation marks, the example in the ...


2

Various style guides have recommendations for citing indirect sources. However it's important to keep in mind that your works cited page is a list of sources you personally have used during your research. Since that's the case, it's recommended (generally) that you don't use indirect sources, but that if you do chose to use indirect sources, you let the ...


2

First of all, you may have to remove the dash before the word "Wind" in your second entry. As for the in-text citation, the first one will be cited as ("Alternative Energy," Discover) and the second as ("Alternative Energy," Wind). This issue has been addressed in MLA 7th edition, section 6.4.4 (Page number in my edition is 223).


2

According to Blakesley & Hoogeveen's Writing: A Manual for the Digital Age, you should write "Work Cited" if there's only one source.


2

The actual page number. Your pdf has been made from another publication. Somebody may have access to the original. They want the actual page number. Also, another pdf made from the same publication may have different page numbers.


2

Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on ...


2

Poet e e cummings and singer k.d. lang are both referenced in all lowercase letters. Singer Prince famously went by an unpronounceable symbol for a few years (which many wrote as The Artist Formerly Known As Prince, or TAFKAP). Many artists go by one name: singers Adele, Cher, Madonna; cartoonist Herblock; French writer Molière; British writer Saki. If you ...


1

When a subsequent quotation is from the same work as the previous one, a page number is enough: In Bob Foo's novel Living the Internet Life, the protagonist is posting comments on websites. His first comment is met with enthusiastic upvoting (34). The protagonist is happy and decides to post more comments (38).


1

In APA you can use et al for in-text citations IF the cited work has 6 or more authors. In fact, don't take my word for it. Read this article from the APA.


1

The various citation styles such as MLA and Chicago, often have a footnote style, or a defacto one -- often the same as the bibliography style. Some citation styles are by normally written as an endnote -- within the bibliography -- Eg IEEE. It very much depends on the context as to what is appropriate. In formal academic writing, eg a journal article ...


1

In the Bibliography: Turbo. (2012). Turbo quick take: Bridging the gender gap. New York: Turbo. Available online at http://www.whereveryoufoundit.com/path/to/document.pdf In text: (Turbo, 2012, p. 7) Google for the Purdue Online Writing Lab, or pick up a copy of the APA Manual at your local public library.


1

You would need to cite the fact that it's a new edition, purely because the page numbers might be different to the old edition. So that your reader can find the exact citation using your reference, you should always be as specific about which edition you're using as you can be. From the OWL at Purdue (my go-to site for MLA): A Subsequent Edition ...



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