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8

In a bibliography I would always give the full original URL. When it goes offline, or a reader does not currently have internet access, people can at least still deduce the publishing context from the domain name or folder structure. Inline, the source is not quoted in full, according to APA. You use a short form, e.g. last name of author(s) and year of ...


6

You don't say which style guide you want to use, so I'm giving an example for APA. When you quote dynamic web content, you give the URL to the online form and describe your query. For example, if you quote the results from a Google search, you simply describe your search terms (and don't even give an URL, because that is common knowledge): A Google ...


4

In this case the author is not unknown. The author is the association. In this case, "American Diabetes Association". Even though there are no direct guidelines but this is the case with almost all citation styles. Also, if you export this citation, the name of the author reads as "American Diabetes Association". Zotero also reads the name as that. The same ...


3

This is widely accepted, a rather common "flavor". Yes, there are legal implications, unless you use public domain works or made-up citations. In case of citations from works still covered by copyright, such use is not covered by Fair Use clause (unless you're parodying the content of the citation in in the following chapter, or referring to it by some ...


3

Consider something like the following: ... has only been thoroughly evaluated by a small number of experts in the xx literature, the most significant of which are (author1992, author1994, ...). By casting it this way you're not implying that you're listing all of them but you're also not just picking some at random. You are saying to your reader: ...


2

I upvoted Greg's answer, because that is what I would do, if for some reason I could not ask the relevant authorities. Your first step should be to get a copy of the thesis formatting guide or manual of your institution. Most universities have one. Your second step, if this guide does not answer your question, should be to ask the examination authority of ...


2

I would not cite the quote differently than any other reference in your thesis. So which ever format your discipline uses (APA, MLA etc...) would be what you would use.


2

As per APA guidelines, to cite anonymous authors: Unknown Author: If the work does not have an author, cite the source by its title in the signal phrase or use the first word or two in the parentheses. Titles of books and reports are italicized or underlined; titles of articles, chapters, and web pages are in quotation marks. A similar study was ...


2

Specifications fall under the same clause as standards (regardless of whether they are official standards or failed to acquire such a status). In your case, it's a standard retrieved from a database. Identifying elements such as patent/standard numbers should be included If no individual author is available, a corporate author can be used in the ...


2

It depends on what is in between quote x from Ferguson and y quote from Ferguson. If there is no quotes in between x and y then you can just refer the page number and if there is a quote in between you need to refer to the source again. Also, if there is no sentences between x and y you can just refer to the source after y. However, I personally tend to stay ...


2

Absolutely cite any hard numbers you use. It's good practice and not nearly common enough, which means it should be encouraged. Given how quickly statistics become outdated, I would definitely cite at least the year of the study/article/whatnot. On Wikipedia some editors would include the date of publication and also date accessed, which is relevant to web ...


1

Usually it's the author or the author's estate/agent/descendant who holds the original copyrights, so you don't need to contact a large number of publishers, just that one entity for bulk of works. In rare cases the author might have fully sold copyrights (as opposed to licensing the publishers for release) and in these cases you will need to contact these ...


1

You must quote the source that you read, not the original publication, if they differ. Some style manuals require that you give the original publication date, e.g. in MLA: Bacon, Francis. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation". 1625. Essays. Ed. Michael J. Hawkins. London: J. M. Dent, 1973. pp-pp. Print. Replace "pp" with the appropriate page numbers. And ...


1

In literature theory or theology, the "original" works and religious texts (can) go in one list, and the scholarly articles in another. That is because your subject of study are texts. So for example, in the first list you have the works of Hemingway, and in the second list you have the scholarship that studies the works of Hemingway. In the natural ...


1

When citing the same source multiple times in a paragraph (and from there an extension being to the entire paper, as is the case in your question), you can do the following (borrowed from here): Introduce the source early in the paragraph, with the author as part of the sentence rather than in brackets: Example: Lazar (2006) describes several ...


1

The correct answer will depend on your style guide. Usually (e.g. in APA) you don't tranlsate author names, publishers, etc. You give everything as it was in the original publication, with no changes. The only part you do translate (into the language of your paper) is the title of the work you cite, e.g. Ministerio de Agricultura. (2012). Plan ...


1

Your example confuses the issue just a bit. There is a difference between print documents that are available online, and online articles. In the former case you don't need to give a link at all, and when you do, you are doing it simply to make the document more accessible. In this case you can use any link shortener that you like. The url is irrelevant to ...


1

I often read meta-analyses. What they do is: explain how they searched for relevant studies (i.e. which databases or bibliographies they used, sometimes even which keywords) give the number of studies they found list the studies in the reference list They never list any sources when they state how many sources they found. Instead they explain how they ...


1

APA offers the following guidelines for citing a computer program/software/programming language (under the "Other electronic media" section): Reference list entries are not necessary for standard off-the-shelf software and programming languages. Provide entries for specialized software or programs with limited distribution. In text, give the name ...


1

Don't quote quotes. Go to the original publication and quote from there. Only if that is not available to you (which is rarely believable with almost everything being available online or through interlibrary loan) may you quote from a secondary source. If you quote a quote or paraphrase, quote it verbatim. The footnote is not part of the text, so don't ...


1

The APA style recommends the following for citing anything from web sites (which would include any claim you're reporting from one): New child vaccine gets funding boost. (2001). Retrieved March 21, 2001, from http://news.ninemsn.com.au/health/story_13178.asp Cite in text the first few words of the reference list entry (usually the title) and the ...


1

If the concern is your blog post, I would recommend you either: a) The hedgehog is 25% more spiky, if raised in temperature 5°C less than average (source) or b) According to the new study from DPKR, the hedgehog is 25% more spiky, if raised in temperature 5°C less than average BTW: Several people are nowadays afraid of SEO, so they do something like ...



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