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17

First off, "grok" is not copyrighted; you can't copyright individual words, even made-up ones. Therefore fair use (a defense against an infringement claim) does not apply. That doesn't mean it's impermissible, in fact it almost certainly is fine. It's also not trademarked, as it is not being used by the Heinlein estate to identify a product or service. And ...


15

You cite a source because it gives additional information that a curious reader may want to follow up on. So: If your prior paper gives additional information (data, methods, background, conclusions, further citations, etc.) that is not in your current paper, but which may be of interest to readers, cite it. By the way, you're not citing yourself; you're ...


12

When citing large blocks of text like a paragraph, you're probably better off indenting the paragraph, and introducing the text. For example: As How to Indent notes (Billy Bob, 2011): It's better to indent long pieces of text, because then it makes clear that you're quoting a lengthy piece of work. By introducing it with a sentence, you also ...


11

As you say, DOIs are becoming dominate in scientific publishing, so it would be useful to have one in that arena. On the other hand ISBN (And it's cousin, the ISSN) are still the main way to identify a publication. There is also a lot of useful things that the ISBN number is used for. Right now you can put an ISBN number into pretty much any bookseller (or ...


8

Remember that although AP Style is used by many different publications and media, it is FOR journalists writing news articles. As such, there really is no such thing as attribution to sources because that doesn't really occur in news writing. Instead, AP Style uses in-text attribution generally in the form of direct or indirect quotations. "Revenues are ...


8

In a bibliography I would always give the full original URL. When it goes offline, or a reader does not currently have internet access, people can at least still deduce the publishing context from the domain name or folder structure. Inline, the source is not quoted in full, according to APA. You use a short form, e.g. last name of author(s) and year of ...


7

You can do both. Use the tiny URL as footnote and provide an appendix/bibliography with the long URLs. Also an accompanying website could list all URLs used in the paper. Tiny URLs have the problem that they disguise usable information for the reader. They do not see immediately if you cite Wikipedia or MIT. This is of course not the case if you mention the ...


7

I have your answer at this site. For Web document, no author (there is an example provided on the site): Title Year, version number (if applicable), description of document (if applicable), name and place of the sponsor of the source, viewed (Day Month Year), URL (with either full location details or just the main site details). For Web ...


7

Kindall tackled the legal aspect. As for reception/perception considerations, here's the rule of thumb I'd use: If you're using the same word in the same way for the same thing, and your story is about that thing (or concept, or whatever) - you're crossing the line. That's like saying "I'm writing a story about the same Smeerps Albert J. Jones wrote about," ...


6

I don't understand the question. How COULD you write a bibliography if you didn't read anything? Or...did you read something, and just not quote it? If you consulted a resource but didn't quote from it, you need to be sure whether you're working in a field that requires a 'Works Cited' page, or a field that requires a 'Bibliography'. Generally, as the ...


6

As others have mentioned, various institutions prefer different formats. On a broader scale, a particular style is often favored by specific disciplines or groups. (For example, APA is popular in the social sciences, while CSE is used in the physical sciences.) In general, if there are only a few sources to cite, it's done in footnotes or parenthetical ...


6

The issue here is that you are referencing a written piece of work, and the URL is likely to be integral to that reference. While the shortened URL does direct you to the location of the work you are citing, the shortened URL is (with few exceptions) not the source of that reference. At best, the shortened URL points you in the direction of the work in ...


6

Anytime you mention something that isn't general knowledge, you need to explain how you know it. So if you're using facts or ideas from a source, you need to cite the source. I'm not quite clear on the distinction between "repeated facts/figures" and "based on information/date from one of the sources". If by "based on" you mean you've drawn your own ...


5

Different situations have different methods. If the two sources cited has authors with the same surname, then the following is done: Although some medical ethicists claim that cloning will lead to designer children (R. Miller 12), others note that the advantages for medical research outweigh this consideration (A. Miller 46). But, normally, ...


5

Maintainer home page: http://tiswww.case.edu/php/chet/bash/bashtop.html BASH is part of the GNU project: http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/ http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/


5

I am not certain if it is what you are looking for, but you can get the xml or unixref formatted citations from DOI on the CrossRef website. Also Connotea is freeware that will produce similar citation formats. If you specifically interested in LaTeX (i.e. BibTeX) formatting, you may be interested in these answers on the TeX site. And on the CrossRef ...


5

Generally no, you do not need permission from the patent holder to use text from their patent application. "Subject to limited exceptions reflected in 37 CFR 1.71(d) & (e) and 1.84(s) , the text and drawings of a patent are typically not subject to copyright restrictions." The exception referenced within deals with patent apps which themselves contain ...


4

I know this has an accepted answer, but it's from Billy Bob. The APA Guide has the following to say: When writing an entire paragraph about a single study, introduce that paragraph by stating that you will refer to the same study throughout the paragraph, then cite the reference. This avoids awkwardness and redundancy. And as to indenting, this ...


4

The sources in the reference list generally validate particular claims that are made in the body of the text. Some style manuals support putting software resources in the reflist, like APA, some don't, like Chicago. In APA (6th ed., section 7.08), the reference should look something like: Free Software Foundation (2007). Bash (3.2.48) [Unix shell ...


4

I found this page after searching the web: How to Reference a Book in AP Style. It outlines how to cite sources, but annoyingly enough, doesn't cite the information it gives. I suspect it's from the AP web edition, as my print version doesn't have anything like this. I commented on this article, and I'll update this answer if I get more information.


4

CMOS says periods and commas go inside. It doesn't make sense, to me, but that's the rule. Bear in mind that this does not apply to question or exclamation marks, which only go inside the quotation marks if they belong to the words being quoted. There's a fairly interesting discussion on this, here.


4

According to the third edition of How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper that I have, one should list only significant, published references. References to unpublished data, papers in press, abstracts, theses, and other secondary materials should not clutter up the References or Literature Cited section (i.e. Bibliography). If such a reference seems ...


4

Chicago Style states that bibliographic list entries should be of the format: Author last name, Author first name. Title. Location of press: Press name, Year Published See here for more: http://www.isr.bucknell.edu/img/assets/6535/chicago.pdf A quick scan through my bookshelf, and I can't find a single bibliography that puts the title first before the ...


4

No, there is no universally accepted standard for this. That doesn't mean there aren't standards you should follow, though. Usually, the set of required fields is dictated by the journal or conference you are publishing in. Many journals have BibTeX styles that will include the required fields for you (as long as they are present in your library, of ...


4

The MLA has a section on graphic novels. Basically, you cite the source in the same way as a regular non-periodical publication. If it's a single author, yes, you would use (Author, Page) format. See the Purdue OWL online writing lab for details on MLA format. See also this site for specific information on how to form graphic novel citations in your Works ...


3

Under MLA, the year used in a citation is the date of publication for the work you're citing, not the original year of the work in question. The reason for this is because a number of things could change between different publications: different forewords, translations, prefaces, grammar and spelling changes ... The example format for your book would be ...


3

MLA guidelines suggest that, when citing an entire work, "it is best to paraphrase the information being used. This way, the author's name (or the name of the work, if it is anonymous), is mentioned in the sentence, but there is no need for particular documentation at the end of the sentence." The example given is as follows: Turner's study served to ...


3

The AP Stylebook is the ultimate resource when it comes to AP style. You can purchase it in several forms through the AP Stylebook website. The print version for $18.95 plus shipping The online version for $25.00 The iOS version for $24.99 (in the App Store). Libraries and universities with journalism programs may also have group subscriptions that you ...


3

You are right. "ibid" is short for "ibidem", meaning "in the same place". It is used to not repeat the same title again and again. Also have a look at this question: Vancouver system, citing multiple sentences from the same book



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