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10

David Becker has written about APA citations for pseudonyms. Citing pseudonyms can seem tricky at first, but it becomes much simpler when you take into account one of APA Style’s key mottos: Cite what you see. When it comes to citing an author, cite whatever name is used by the source, whether it be a real name or a pseudonym. For example, The ...


7

I can think of an exercise which might help - although I'm not sure how efficient it would be - if the students would be able to solve it. Chose a set of sources for them and give them a task that forces cross-referencing, comparing and binding them. For example, give the students a task of examining and proving or disproving a claim in source A (which you ...


6

You don't say which style guide you want to use, so I'm giving an example for APA. When you quote dynamic web content, you give the URL to the online form and describe your query. For example, if you quote the results from a Google search, you simply describe your search terms (and don't even give an URL, because that is common knowledge): A Google ...


5

Way back in 10th grade, when we were learning how to do research papers on the back of a coal shovel, our teacher had us take all our notes on 3x5 cards. We had to submit them as part of the grade — she actually went around with a bag and we had to toss in our rubber-banded stack of cards. Edit to clarify: Each card had one note or thought on it: ...


5

This is called quoting from an indirect source. And, yes, if you don't take your quotations from the original source, you need to acknowledge the intermediary. This is in part to recognize the work that person did, but also to protect yourself in case that person misquoted the original source. I don't know the audience for your work, so I don't know which ...


3

Generally the rule of thumb with web pages is to treat the title of the page or the domain as the title of the inline citation, so if the page title is 'Google Public Data', go with that. In practice I think that 'Google' is a little too general, because of the number of products Google provide. You would also need to provide the url in your full citation. ...


2

If your professor wants it, put it in, regardless of aesthetic considerations. If your professor wants to you type from the bottom up, in sparkling teal ink, in Comic Sans... that's how you format it.


2

Yes, just repeat the citation. If you consider beauty aspects, you can also use ibid. for the second citation, but that's depending on your citation style (Vancouver or other stuff).


2

I don't know if the rules for citing from speech are any different from those of citing from text, however, if you are to cite something or someone verbatim, you need to put it in quotes, if not also as a separate paragraph. In cases where the article/object of the quote is tacit, you may place it in square brackets as part of the quote. This also applies ...


2

I see the §-sign mainly used in legal texts, maybe your co-author has the same problem. If you use the section sign, I would put a space (a small non-breaking) between the sign and the numbers (§ 8.5.2). Using page numbers instead is a nice thing to do, especially if you refer to a single page in a bigger section. If you want to refer to the whole section, ...


2

This applies within the Harvard Referencing system. You may need to check which referencing system you should be working to. If the points taken from source have been separated by other points that are not from source, then yes, you need to recite a reference for each point. If this is the case you may want to consider revising your work so that all the ...


2

I would not cite your secondary source except to note that it was used to obtain the list of reports that you used to actually write the paper. If you are not using any other content, then you wouldn't have anything else to specifically cite. Some would argue that since these primary sources were available independently, then you would only need to cite ...


2

I'll answer this question from an uncommon perspective. The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) recommends that you do not use the ™ or ® symbols but requires that you capitalize trade and brand names (2009, p. 102-103). If a whole science can do without these symbols, so can you. If you are unsure, look how respectable ...


2

I think if you indicated somewhere (preface, end notes, first footnote) that the translations are all yours, you could either write the Arabic and then your translation, or write it in English (or whatever language) and footnote it and have the referent be the original Arabic with the citation information. As a reader, I would assume any translation I'm ...


2

Unfortunately you don't explain what you need to identify the publisher for. If you want to quote a source in a text that you write, the first place to look for information about the publisher is the title page, the top of which lists the author and book title, and the bottom of which usually lists the publisher and place, sometimes the year, of ...


2

I had a professor who did a synthesis lecture using fruit. She brought in a brown paper grocery bag and started pulling out produce one at a time. The purpose was to come up with a general rule to determine if something was a fruit or a vegetable. Apple: Fruit Peas: Vegetable Lettuce: Vegetable Rule 1: Vegetables are green Carrot: Vegetable Potato: ...


2

This (pdf guide by Austin Peay State University) states the following about citing the same source multiple time in the same paragraph: When citing a source the first time, use the author’s name(s) unless the name is used as part of the sentence that introduces the source’s text. Example: The expert of writing claims, “MLA Style of formatting is ...


1

If you cite an included full quotation and immediately discuss it phrase by phrase, then you don't have to cite every phrase, every time. That's just silly. I'd go so far as to say it's insulting, as it implies you think your readers are morons. But if the partial quotes are some paragraphs removed from the original quote, with discussion between that ...


1

Like you mentioned, introducing the source in the first line is usually what is done in case of citing the same source multiple times in the same paragraph. You could state the first line as something similar to The product documentation (inline citation) states that blah blah blah Now you can continue writing the rest of the lines in your paragraph. ...


1

That would be a nice scenario to use ibid., but sadly that's discouraged in MLA. I'm surprised that you can omit them in APA, but so what. Be aware why marking the citations is needed: to distinguish your ideas from the ones you borrowed. So if the paragraph includes your sentences embedded with in-text citations, you should mark each sentence ...


1

The usual approach is to write both the citation (marked up either with quotes or italics) and its reference with the natural flow, making them visually distinct but semantically following the flow of text seamlessly: As the DK-Handbook recommends, you need to give readers information about the source. How exactly you present the source depends on how ...


1

Since the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (commonly called the Vancouver system) is also widely referred to as an Author-Number system, it will necessary to have a number for each author of a multi-chapter compilation (and more than one number for an author who produced two or more chapters). Logically the treatment of ...


1

The key to your question lies in the phrase no changed meaning by standardizing. The designer of the original publication might have elected to set all article titles in a Gothic font to align with other design elements on the page. We do not feel compelled to retain that font choice when referencing the article; why should capitalisation be treated any ...


1

Don't quote quotes. Go to the original publication and quote from there. Only if that is not available to you (which is rarely believable with almost everything being available online or through interlibrary loan) may you quote from a secondary source. If you quote a quote or paraphrase, quote it verbatim. The footnote is not part of the text, so don't ...


1

While I realize that this question is very old, I am providing an answer should others require this information. For in-text citations, it is sufficient to construct the sentence as follows: According to the terms of service for Google search, images, books, etc ...(n.d.) Typically, in APA style, when a source does not list an author or a date of ...


1

There is no rule stating that you have to stick to one in-text citation style or the other for the whole paper. If you're including a direct quote, you need to include the author, year of publication, and the page number for the reference, but they don't all have to be in parentheses. You can mention the author in a signal phrase. I think mixing the two ...


1

You can incorporate the secondary source in your narrative. Since your problem section is, most likely, early on in your paper: Paul Ricoeur (1991), in From Text to Action, posits on Hiedegger's interpretation of language, based on Wittgenstein's initial foray into the phenomenology of language. Heidegger analyzes (cite from Ricoeur) Wittgenstein's interest ...


1

I believe the answer is to cite ( and reference ) them as "Microsoft, 2010a" and "Microsoft, 2010b", putting them in date order if you have a more precise date of production, or any order if you don't. It is also a problem for other authors who are especially prolific, and produce multiple related publications in a year. Most of the time, academic authors ...



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