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I would recommend giving yWriter a try. yWriter is a full novel writing tool, similar to Scrivener. It allows you to create character summaries and it can track a characters progress through the story, IE what scenes and chapters he appears in. It is also FREE.


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I think Scrivener answers your needs almost completly if not to all of them. It has a very good system to understand and keep up with your characters. Furthermore in my opinion, it is a great software to develop and write your stories.


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I suspect people will object to me saying this, but still, wanted to give some food for thought: Why not just keep plain text files, or documents made in whatever word processor you prefer? I'm 32, and I've been writing on a computer since I was 18, so I have about 14 years of character and worldbuilding documents built up, for several different universes. ...


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I am looking for similar software and i'd be interested to know if you've found anything since you asked this question. The only thing i've found in my search is a piece of software called WriteItNow. In regards what you were seeking, this is what i've learned about WriteItNow from their Demo (which, by the way, does not allow you to save... so i didn't ...


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Platonov suggested compressing all episodes, especially boring episodes. You have a story with a great character who is not a significant one. (They're neither the perspective character nor the hero, who are two or one and the same.) Frequently present and visible they* behave intelligently and wittily, contribute humor, and is a person fun to write about ...


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Consider whether this is possible: Merge this character with another one who is integral to the plot.


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To take off on Lauren Ipsum's short, but excellent answer, you have three choices: 1) Re-write your current story so that your "cool" character is a key, perhaps main, character whose importance in the overall story matches his importance in individual scenes. 2) Remove the character from this story and give him a separate story, 3) A hybrid of the two: ...


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Character difference is relative. Two spies are almost certainly more like one another than a spy and a nun, but that doesn't mean you can't write a book about two spies. They entered the service for the same reason, and they feel the same way about their job. Just take all the similarities as your baseline, and figure out how they differ when you take the ...


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There are nearly an infinite amount of ways to differentiate these characters. What you have described are easily observable traits such as physical looks, and their basic beliefs. What you are missing is what makes these people appear real, and not just two dimensional characters that are born on X date and died on Y date. Find out more about their home ...


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I was reminded of the story of twin brothers, who "had entirely different tastes in women." They may do many of the same things, but go about them differently. One may be "spiritual, the other non-religious. They may have different intellectual gifts, one may be better with words, the other with numbers. One may be nicer, or at least more sincere than the ...


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I don't have any techniques to offer, but I can point you to some examples. Thirty-five years ago, I was reading Robert Silverberg's Lord Valentine's Castle. Partway into the story, someone teaches the main character how to juggle. I put the book down and started following the instructions. It worked. I don't think I ever picked up the book again. But now ...


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Well, it's not purely historical fiction, if it's also science fiction. And even in historical fiction, the word "fiction" has a role to play in the final result. I'd say you probably want to focus on the role these characters are playing not in history, but in your book. If they are truly indistinguishable - they have the same opinions, same knowledge, ...


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Given the nature of the transformation, this is clearly magical. As Kate said, you get to decide how the magic affects tattoos. What would be the most interesting for your story? If the story takes place in the otherwise real world, tattoos on a child would certainly draw attention, and perhaps lead to all sorts of delicious conflict (what sort of lowlife ...


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Make their similarity a theme in your narration. These people are friends and work together because they are so similar. It is enough that you clearly identify them by name, profession and life circumstances (live at different place, have different family, etc.), but don't destroy the driving factor of that relationship. Rather, have the narrator, or even ...


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Give them a physical difference. Something to visualize the contrast binds the concept of the character to the visual part of the brain. I personally am a fan of facial hair for this particular case as it is visual memorable, capable of great variation and in most cases insignificant to the plot or the character. if one has a mustache and the other does not ...



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