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As others here have mentioned, you want to show, not tell--have your smart, clever, insightful and thoughtful guy do smart, clever, insightful and thoughtful things, rather than just dictating a description. That said, if you can't think of smart, clever, insightful and thoughtful things for your character to do, here's a way to cheat: think of some people ...


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Another way to add interest is to create a situation in which the heroine's reasons for refusing to consider the hero are tied to her own personal issues. For instance, in Muriel Barbery's The Elegance of the Hedgehog, the protagonist (a lowly concierge) hides her brilliant mind from her upper-class employers because of deep-seated fears that are based on ...


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A classic take on this from the Bard is Much Ado About Nothing (I also recommend this wonderful filmed version, which stays fairly close to the text). Beatrice and Benedick both swear they will never marry, are not interested in relationships, and are certainly not attracted to each other. They preen and posture and announce and declare, but when their ...


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It depends on just how well you portray your words. You can have a variety of different names to chose from. Here is an example of how you shouldn't name your characters: Apple was a smart student and she had a knack for climbing trees. Apple did not fall far from the tree. Yet you can simply take an imaginary name such as Auburn and simply portray ...


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Think of everything in the story in terms of "actors". Do they appear near enough to be confusable? Do they appear in contexts where one can be confused with the other? In your case it's rather distant. Sure, there are contexts where they can be problematic. We're going to hitch a ride to Hilfinger We're going to hitch a ride to Helmin. That's ...


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Based on the Topic rather than the comment following. There are several character names that are the same as an object. Richard Castle Jessica Steele Robert Stone Henry Block Jason Sand, etc. Names sounding like their origin. Mork from Ork. Elmer of Selmer Bluto from Pluto, etc. I would stay away from many names to avoid confusion. That being said, many ...


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Don't stress about it. There are only so many consonants in the English language. The similarity would have to be pretty big before anyone noticed it. In the specific case you give, I don't think it is. Sure, they both start with the same letter, but other than that they have almost nothing in common. Consider the number of characters, locations and items ...



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