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1

Here is a generator for Hindu names. http://fantasynamegenerators.com/hindu_names.php You can pick among hundreds - names and family names.


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Try asking for suggestions in the NaNoWriMo ("National Novel Writing Month") sub-forum "Appellation Station" or at the Livejournal community devoted to fact-checking for writers "Little Details" . I found out about both of these via the answers people here kindly gave to this question, which was about resources for real-world research generally. When ...


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I use http://www.fakenamegenerator.com/gen-male-us-us.php You can choose gender, country, and group.


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What is your story purpose for giving the machine POV? Why does the reader need to get inside the machine's "head?" If you want to show the machine's limitations, it can be done with a POV human struggling to get the machine to understand. Now if you intend for the machine to make an important mistake at some point, then I can see using the machine's POV.


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First of all, every main character in the history of the world has to change in a certain way. That's how you know your character has grown. Whether it be coming out of their shell, growing up, or learning new things, your character has to change and learn something at the end of any story. Now, your character can't just change. There has to be buildup, ...


3

You don't need to overthink this. Readers will accept whatever reality you present to them so long as it is consistent. Just create a set of rules for the robot's AI then write the character as you would for a human. For example: It can only use 100 basic words and key phrases. It will only process the world as raw data. It doesn't see colors or humans; ...


4

Write it as data inputs and responses. INPUT: USER 1 enters room RESPOND Y/N? Y OUTPUT_$content: {greeting}; {Salutation: 'Good'} {TOD: 1415, 'afteroon'}; INPUT: USER 1 response {"Good afternoon yourself. Did you finish compiling that report?"} SEARCH_DB6b.46: report {SMITH, CHARLES: activities prior 72 hours}; LOCATED COMPLETE Y/N? N ET COMPLETION: 4.7 ...


4

A few possibile viewpoints: An omniscient narrator who describes what the machine does and says. One of the nearby sentient beings, when any are available to observe the machine's important actions or communications. Reports from someone who pieces together the machine's communications and actions from available evidence after the fact.


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Although I like the concept of character interviews, in this special case, I would sketch the entire character's biography. In that way you not only have a clear idea of the character's personality state at the two times of your story, but you will also have a keen sense of the character's development in-between (think Boyhood here). It's more work, but for ...


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I like that they're not romantic interests. It seems to always be romantic these days. In modern movies, and a bunch of YA books, it's often mandatory that they fall in love/have sex/sexual tension. It's like, a law or something of stories these days. But you DON'T. The sheer number of stories that have the woman be the romantic interest is just ...


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You can most definitely add POVs. As a reader, I don't remember ever being bothered by multiple POVs (other than in a suspense sort of way, as in I'm interested in what POV A has going on right now, then it switches to POV B, but it's a good way to get pages turning), and it could be an excellent tool for adding information you think is necessary about ...


3

Both ages as separate interviews, since his answers will be different and you will have to handle his responses differently. In the second interview, he can even look back and say "Yeah, I remember the first time you asked me this. I can't believe I said X! Now I know thus-and-such and it's definitely Y."


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There are plenty of examples of novels about adults written for young people in the canon. Look at Rosemary Sutcliffe for example. But this involves a different view of how a reader identifies with a work. Traditionally, most works were written for the reader looking outward. They were windows. For children or young adults, they were about looking forward ...


1

The first-person narrator, as Lauren Ipsum's answer points out, readily lends itself to namelessness. The problem here would be that the first person narrator is usually invisible anyway. Explicitly thematising namelessness is perhaps best achieved by taking something conventionally visible and making it ostentatiously invisible. Freud's Totem and Taboo ...


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I think it is dangerous to switch POVs. It is difficult enough to succeed as a writer, so why stack more obstacles if you do not have to. I agree with @What. The reader will like the character or the world. If the reader identifies with the POV character, switching POV would be detrimental. Multiple POVs are more adapted to very detail led epic worlds, ...


1

I actually think that this story would work better with someone who is 18-20. I haven't read any YA novels for a few years now, so I don't know at which point plots and themes might be deemed too complex for such an audience, but here is what I would do. Being early 30s with a wife and kids and a stable job is not only normal for a lot of people, it is the ...


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You can do whatever you want in your novel. I am writing a book with 4 protagonists, which goes against the rules as well. But if you have enough skill, you can do it. Look at Orson Scott Card's Enders game--I've heard he does this in the book. (Only with 2 characters, not 3.)


3

Your listed themes and goals are at cross-purposes. You have: finding your place in the world living according to your values figuring out what really matters to you questioning assumptions sticking up against authority who gets to decide what a society should be like balancing desires that are equally important but can't be reconciled (the rebellion and ...


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The night watch series (Sergei Lyuenko) each book is made up of sub-stories each of which has several central protagonists as well as sub-protagonists who are antagonists in other stories. This sounds like what you are trying to do. Peter F. Hamilton also writes a lot of stories with a LOT of protagonists but generally has one main storyline and then ...


3

Brandon Sanderson's Elantris does this to good effect. There are three protagonists, all of whom are intelligent, strong characters who are competent enough to carry a story on their own: Crown Prince Raoden, the most beloved man in the kingdom of Arelon. His father is not a particularly competent king, and Raoden is the only one who has a good chance of ...


1

Does your story have an ensemble cast? If yes, then having 3 (or more) main characters is expected. Look at Game of Thrones. It has many main characters and you can root for any of them. Here are some guidelines for deciding format of story based on number of main characters. If you have one main character, the story should focus on that person. This ...


1

I just finished reading Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising sequence which does almost exactly this, although over five books. The first book has three siblings as main characters, book 2 has one boy (with many siblings), book 3 has the boy and a second boy both as main characters, and books 4 and 5 use all the kids. I was fine with the idea of the story ...


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Welcome to the site, Chimere! As a general rule, it's best to stick with one protagonist. As @Private has mentioned, if you have two, it should generally be a hero and a heroine (please see the comments below for details). However, I've asked a good number of questions myself, and I know that your story probably requires three protagonists, otherwise you ...


3

It's your book; you make the rules. If writing it that way would inspire you to write more creative and vivid passages, then do it. If you're writing for others, the bottom line when it comes to 'rules' is that your work must engage the reader and make them want to continue reading.


0

I was also searching for a similar tool that would help me in organizing my characters. I stumbled upon Charahub in one of the sites that I visited. You can add a lot of things about each character and also connect them to other characters. There is also an option to group your characters (i.e. group them according to family name). Charachub has free and ...


1

To me, your question sounds, as if you have trouble showing the gradual development of your character. A good discussion of how to provide well-rounded characters arcs is provided, for example, in Chris Vogler's The Writer's Journey: This was the most helpful book I've ever read about storytelling. It adresses the very essence of what a story is and how ...


2

First of all, I think that there is no definitive answer to a question like this. Stories are different, and a mechanism that worked fine in one story might fail in another. You will have to try out what works best for your story. That being said I don't see a reason why introducing a new POV in the second book of your series should not work out. Think of ...


2

I always answer these kinds of questions from my own experiences as a reader. For me as a writer it is irrelevant, how many other authors have done this or that; the deciding factor is how I feel about it as a reader. So my first suggestion would be that you find examples of what you want to do, read them, and see how you feel about them. I can't really ...


0

To answer this question, if you have the time and the will to read five very long novels, read the series A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin. There is a different POV in each chapter, and the chapters are title by whose viewpoint is being trotted out. Sometimes the chapters are even about characters who have undergone a transformation, and their ...


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I think the previous answers are better than what I am about to tell you but if it was me writing it I'd give my character a REASON to stop running. I would have my character witness something so horrible s/he would realize that there is no running,that they personally would have to do something about it for the sake of others (or even just him/herself) s/he ...


4

First of all, your protagonist almost must change, or there's not much point to your book. If s/he does not at some point stop running and pull him/herself together, your reader will feel like the book is a waste of time. To make it seem not rushed or fake, you need two things: sufficient buildup before the epiphany to give enough space to the epiphany ...


1

What do you think the reader will expect? I don't think that when reading your novel, they will think: "Well, he is going to be scared the rest of the novel, he will never do anything, the end." I think, that by creating the conflict, and the scared protagonist, the readers will expect him to not be scared at some point, and do something about the conflict. ...


1

That's up to you. Whether you decide to advance the plot in each chapter or not is entirely your call. Your readers may disagree with your decision, but frankly that's their problem. Ultimately, what you write is yours. If your goal is to sell copies, then by all means appeal to the common denominator. If your goal is to convey meaning, not everybody is ...


0

In short, it depends on how feminine you want your character to be. The average man will not "blink back tears" often and usually tend towards anger or another irrational emotion instead. Washing tears away is okay, if he gets angry afterward. A more masculine character would lead towards anger of discovering an affair then sadness. In other words, crying ...


0

I was going to add this as a comment, as it involves responding to another comment you have made on the answer of @Snarkeet, but it ended up being quite long, so I'll try to flesh it out into a proper answer. You should not be surprised that your female beta reader understands less how a male character would act when they're alone. You can't expect a female ...


0

Honestly, haven't we already had more than enough macho, tough-guy characters who are too strong and silent to express their emotions? In my opinion, that kind of character has become a cliche. Men in fiction are emotionally stunted and are only allowed to show aggression and pride. They can get mad, they can break things, they can hit people, but they can't ...


1

I believe there are actual physiological reasons (related to hormones?) that adult men are less likely to cry. I'm far from a "tough guy" but I've personally found it more difficult and rare to experience tears as I grow older. We also can't discount social and cultural pressures against male tears that are stricter in some cultures and sub-cultures than ...


2

A man crying is not unrealistic. From what you've stated here, there are two emotional stressors acting on him: the rejection from the woman he's in love with and the discovery that his dead wife cheated on him. Find more beta readers. Seriously. This level of emotion is reasonable, given the character's temperament and what's happened. Now, that being ...


0

If he is a sensitive man, then writing about him crying will convey that to the reader. And yeah, even a less sensitive man might cry when he discovers that his former wife was carrying on an affair. You could ask other male test readers besides that one. If you ask several, you're more likely to get a well rounded opinion than just asking one person.


0

Perhaps to see more deeply into the villain's character, you could write about what he is doing when he is not just sitting beside his desk delegating...his decisions there impact Anna, but what leads to those decisions? Does he make one decision because of something that irritated him at breakfast? Is catching Anna on his mind at other times, like when he's ...


2

There are no hard and fast rules. It all depends on the context. Even an omniscient narrator is going to focus on one viewpoint character at a time. So, consider that person's point of view. How will they address a given character? How will they refer to the character when speaking about them to someone else? (This also depends on who they're speaking to, ...


0

Yes, there must be substance to every chapter, or else what is the point from including it in the book? Padding? Do not mistake things happening though, with action. A chapter (or scene) can be about a soldier in a battle; the soldier's musings in the hospital tent, after taking an injury; his emotional struggles and major decision he made on the march back ...


1

Well let's look at this from the perspective of the Generals: Whilst this object that could turn the tide of the war is obviously important, it might turn out to just be rumor, or might end up being so well hidden that neither side would ever find it. Therefore committing a significant number of soldiers to pursue the girl is a massive waste of resources. ...


1

So give your villain more to do. Raise the stakes. If the General overseeing the various troops and hunters doesn't feel scary enough, give him more motivation. Give him someone REALLY scary to report to who is breathing down his neck and has no tolerance for failure, or even lateness, on pain of death. Or the Bigger Bad is holding the General's family ...


1

Define chapter where nothing happens? Even if there are chapters that do not have a lot of action, perhaps a group is sitting talking, or people are simply walking down a side walk observing things, etc, each chapter needs to have a purpose. Seeing your explanation in the comments, I believe what you are thinking about is what some call a "filler ...



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