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As I understand him, Michael Hauge mixes up the "mentor" from the Hero's Journey approach to storytelling and the function that secondary characters have for film. From your other questions I believe that you are writing novels, not film scripts, Tom. To answer your question you need to consider one of the fundamental differences between novels and films ...


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The reflection character, as I understand it, is literally someone who reflects the protagonist: someone who echoes parts of the protagonist's character or situation to expose the subtext and make it more visible. The reflector could be an antagonist or an ally, or neither. On the BBC's Sherlock, S3E1, "The Empty Hearse," Sherlock's parents (cleverly ...


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Same old worn joke. The humorous character did keep some running gag. A kind of jab at a younger partner, or some silly "ritual", or a funny one-liner reply. The reader is used to this joke, it was done at least twice in the story before, probably to a good humorous effect too (first time, sheer surprising humor, the other - a contextual humor that adds a ...


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I think Dexter(tv series) is a good example. Like in season 1 when he is about to kill a couple he asks them questions about their married life, so that he can use their suggestions for his life also. He is about to kill them but still is able to make the situation filled with some sense of dark humor without degrading the scene.


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Immediately after the humorous moment, do something that amplifies the emotion you want to emphasize.


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Make the joke relevant to the situation — this will stop the reader from being distracted by the humour of the joke, and keep the serious atmosphere. Even bad or very funny jokes can be used if the character delivers them correctly. And now some examples: In the Time Riders series by Alex Scarrow, when two pirates are about to hanged, one says to the ...


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No, you do not have to keep calling the character by his or her full name. It would make it very awkward to have to read "Ted Dibar does this", "Ted Dibar does that", all the way through the script. Go ahead and call him Ted in the action lines. Or TED when it's formatted above dialogue. And read scripts. They're all over the web (e.g., the mother-lode of ...


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"Flat" characters are often stereotyped, cookie cutter characters that do everything that is expected of them. You want characters with contradictions, or at least with a ability to a surprise people. A "dumb blonde" is a stereotype. A ditsy cheerleader is someone who makes most readers put the book down. A good looking blonde who has no interest in guys, ...


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Originally, in folk belief, elves where dangerous and mysterious beings, whose motifs where unfathomable to man and like forces of nature beyond the categories of good or evil: if you put your hand in the fire it will burn you, without any evil intent on the fire's part; if you dealt with elves they were just as likely to help as to hurt you as the wind or ...


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Elric of Melniboné by Michael Moorcock involved an elvish emperor who sacrificed his own people, and was frequently in conflict with human warriors. Elric's motivations and observations were described well by the author, such that the reader could relate. Heaven's Reach by David Brin involved two non-human protagonists, one being a chimpanzee, the other ...


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Up to the writing. If you create characters with whom your audience can identify in some fashion, someone to root for, then their species doesn't matter. Diane Duane has many non-human protagonists and hero characters in her various books: sentient fish and trees in her Young Wizards series, Romulans and Vulcans in her Star Trek books, a series about ...


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When Socrates was about to drink hemlock, he asked, "May I pour out a libation to the gods?" And they told him "no", which is dark on another level. He had no respect for them or their pantheon, but they still took everything so seriously. After all, Socrates was dying because of their faith and their unwillingness to tolerate skepticism. You may be wrong ...


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Like anything else, it won't work if you try to graft it on at the last moment. It has to be true to the character and situation to not break your reader's suspension of disbelief. Making jokes in serious or tragic situations happens in real life all the time, so it can read as real if it's really something your character would do. But if not, it's going ...


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I would begin by looking at what the character does, either for a living, or in their spare time. Many modern surnames (and some first names) are based on occupation. For instance (black)Smith or tailor (Taylor). The second thing to look at is attributes describing the person long (tall), short, swift, etc. By the time you have written a complete ...


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What I do: I start with either a last name or a first name. Which one I start from depends on which one the narrator uses to identify the character, because that is what the reader will read most often. Katniss Everdeen is Katniss first; Dr. Henry Jekyll is Dr. Jekyll first. With this starting point, and the knowledge of the character's cultural ...


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Gallows humor, in my experience, can be greatly assisted by the word wry. This can be used to indicate that the character is aware of the gravity of the situation but is still making a joke. For example: The executioner asked, "Any last words?" Alex smiled wryly and replied, [some joke] Something else you can do is just not make the joke too silly or ...



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