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Autism is... complicated. Before I start explaining, a few words about my background: I've been diagnosed with (a mild form of) autism, and work for a company that primarily employs autistic people, mostly from the "high-functioning" end of the spectrum (who would not fit your requirements). Make of that what you will, I just wanted to clarify where I come ...


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There could be a simple answer to "rebalancing" the roles of the backstory and main story. That is, pull part of your backstory into your main story, and leaving only a "remainder" as "backstory." If some facts of your backstory are so compelling, maybe they don't begin there.


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I don't claim to know anything about autism, but speaking of mental handicaps in general: "All autistic people are different." Well, sure. But I presume there is some definition of "autistic", some set of symptoms, that all autistic people would share to some extent, or the word doesn't have any meaning. I'm sure that all people with broken legs are ...


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Many autistic people I know would hate a royal wedding because of the crowds, the noise, etc. Many, but not all, are hyper sensitive to noise, colour and confusion. Also, it is different from the normal routine.


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There are different kinds of autism, and people have them in different degrees. The best way to learn what autism looks and feels like is to read books by autists and the people that live ot work with them. Don't read scientific articles, but narrative accounts. There are a few books in which autists describe their own experiences. There is also fiction ...


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I too am having problems with this. My way of solving the problem is to start with the setting. Is your plot set in a real place? If so, you can look for names from that region. If you like, you can do some research about the origins and meanings of those names, so you can be sure they fit your character. I usually use http://www.behindthename.com/ for ...


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I'm also an aspiring writer, and am working on a TV series. I want to kill my main character too, the protagonist. I want to do this because I want my style to be more realistic and believable, not all planned out and outlined like most fiction. In real life does the protagonist live forever, let alone win? No. In reality heroes die. All the time. Every day, ...


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I've actually seen this used deliberately, to help establish the character of the... err... character in question. In the first chapter of The Tales of Paul Twister, we're introduced to Paul, a thief-for-hire in a magical world who's got a bit of a sour, snarky attitude about the world around him in general and his line of work in particular. He's been ...


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Character is in trouble situation on a planet and danger is closing in. He is in a good mood and he is speaking over a com with his mates, quoting: "Houston, we got a problem." But in this universe for example Earth does not exist. I'm going to edge away from the opinion part and try to focus on the when and why it may be appropriate. As with so many ...


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This is certainly valid in some contexts, e.g., in a parody, or while leaning on the fourth wall, for example ... "And using this device you can communicate if there are any issues." explained Houston. "Oh, great, but what if I have to fix it first, «Houston, we've had a problem?»" However, I would advise you against using it if you are not ...


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If the quote is in reference to something that would not exist at all in the world you've created, it is completely inappropriate. Even if it happens to be a quote that would make contextual sense (no references to anything in our world), I would still avoid it. References to things that happen in our world, in a world that is not ours, only serve to ...


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In my opinion it's ok to use such quotes, if an "explanation" is following, like: "He didn't really know, why those words appeared in his mind. They made no sense, but jsut sounded right in this situation." However, if you use this too often, it surely will break the idea of your story.


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For your "Houston" example, definitely not if Apollo 13 is not culturally relevant to the person saying it. You can use some sayings from this universe in your universe, for example Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Because this could come about without someone having seen The Godfather Part II. It's just advice. But any quote or ...


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Please, don't. I have often encountered this in Fantasy and Science Fiction, and it breaks my make-believe. I am immediately thrown out of my beautiful escapist reverie and back on my sofa. I hate when authors do that. I expect a fiction to be consistent, and the narrator has to be part of the fiction if this is to work. The only setup where a quote like ...


1

It very largely would depend on the quote you are using, and how you are using it. Using 'Houston we've got a problem' on a planet that has no Houston is going to leave the reader a little confused. Using 'Foobar we've got a problem' would fit better, and the reader would understand the context you're likely aiming for. The thing to be careful of is to ...


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I had same problem. My main character is affected of sort of DID (dissociative identity disorder). I made my way in a different path than other answerers. 1) Will be all of them dominate or you will have one main personality and other will be something like voices in your head? 2) Will your other personalities take control of a "body" and its actions? ...


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I don't read romance novels, but I've seen a few romance movies. It seems to me that finding some odd way to get the characters together is pretty typical of such movies. Having two people meet through a dating service is fairly boring. So neither of your characters is outgoing enough to initiate a romance, maybe not even outgoing enough to initiate a ...


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Yes, the narrator can be a secondary character. The beautiful Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller is about the warrior Achilles and his life, but told by his lover Patroclus. The Great Gatsby is told by Nick Carraway, almost a tertiary character in the love story between Gatsby and Daisy. All the Sherlock Holmes stories are about Holmes, but almost all ...


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Do not try to think harder. It will just hurt. :) Instead, think different. Consider the Challenge of Describing a Real Person Have you ever tried to think about a real person and tried to describe her without thinking about what the person does? Oh, sure you can probably describe what the person looks like but then after that, what happens? Without ...


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Here are some things you might think about, related to the character's power: How did the character come to have the power? How did the character discover having the power? How did the character learn to control the power? What mistakes did the character make while learning to use the power? Who was hurt by those mistakes? What does the character not yet ...


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When hope that the protagonist(s) will win is snuffed out. I came very close to this with Person of Interest in the middle of the most recent season. There are a number of Good Folks and several groups of Bad Folks. About mid-season the Bad Folks had racked up so many successes and the Good Folks were getting boxed into such a corner that I was struggling ...


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I guess it really depends on the readers. There's a lot of fuss about GRR Martin, and if he does have a tendency to kill off characters unexpectandly, there are less murders in the books than in the series. And there are some author more prone to characters killing, as can be seen in many internet memes. Nevertheless, IMHO, the key isn't the death toll, but ...


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When there's no one likeable left alive. Or if there is anyone, you just know they're either faking it or doomed. TV Tropes calls it Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy. I lasted until somewhere in the third Game of Thrones book. Or maybe it was only the second, I can't remember. Then I put the book down because I didn't want to read an account of a rape and ...



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