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By having the 'moron' use faulty logic, nonsensical assumptions, and idiotic conclusions. Though you have to make sure it isn't silly, unless you want to write comedy.


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Interacting with people who think differently is a good way to start. Using the word 'moron' is a bad place to start. I have very strong spatial thinking skills - I can imagine things in 3D and can intuitively understand how mechanical things work, but I'm very bad with numbers and math. My wife is nearly the opposite. She thinks in words and logic, ...


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Antagonists and villains (which are not identical) do things for the same reasons that protagonists and heroes (which are not identical) do. They have the same motivations. Antagonists and villains feel like they are the protagonists and heroes of their own stories. In the case of real historical persons and real historical conflicts used in fiction, ...


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You could make the story lighter by setting some scenes in a peaceful landscape, perhaps in the homes of the characters, showing who they are fighting for. You could have the protagonists suffer defeats and setbacks and hardships in the first chapters, and start to break down, and seem on the verge of defeat. Then have chapters set in the enemy camp,and ...


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What I would do, is give the characters something to look forward to. Give them something to fight for. They need a motivation to keep going, something to comfort them in their time of need. I think by giving the characters this, you'd be able to make them have more courage and generally be happier for what is to come. Always give characters a motivation.


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I think the trope is less of a conscious choice than the result of a series of decisions by the author. First, the author wants the protagonist to have broad appeal. Because he is intended to be a reader-substitute, he cannot be unusual in any way that is not unambiguously positive. He can be smarter, stronger, richer, or better-looking, on the theory ...


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I am not sure there is a certain origin for this specific combination. All three characters draw from typical archetypes/stereotypes, and I guess that this specific composition feels the most balanced. You can learn more about these typical archetypes in this very interesting undergraduate thesis about Harry Potter: Sörensen, J. (2013). Archetypes and ...


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You can talk to real-life veterans and see how they coped with war. One tactic is "gallows humor" or "black humor," which is seeing the humor even in grim moments (common to veterans, law enforcement officers, doctors, and first responders). The TV show MASH was essentially built on this. There are many examples on the TV Tropes page (consider yourself duly ...


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Some of the stories that I have read are incredibly dark, based simply on the events that occur, but did not feel that way when read. Bringing out a lighter side can be done in a number of ways: Characters/ Relationships Having characters that are hopeful or optimistic will go a long way to brightening a story (unless they are annoyingly optimistic to the ...


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Wikipedia is also a decent source of information about names (though I'm not sure about the English version). It often gives the etymology and the names of famous people who have (or had) the name. It also says if the name is shared, with different meaning, by other cultures, which can be useful to prevent cultural misunderstandings about where the character ...


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Indian culture is very complex. The names and characteristics of Indian royalty varies from state to state. To create a royal name you will need to answer several questions. What is the period your character is set in? This is important because names have evolved over the years. TL;DR. I will restrict my name choices to a particular part of North India. ...



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