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I am actually adding a second answer based on something @user16583 mentioned. In some long-running comic strips, characters don't age or change. Strips like FoxTrot and Sally Forth occasionally make sly meta-jokes referencing the idea that the kids in the strip have been 10 or 12 for decades. Beetle Bailey has been doing the same thing for 70 years. But ...


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The TV show "Seinfeld" is an example of a show where the characters didn't develop. They never learn anything about themselves and this was a source of humor in the show. Or at least it must have been for the people who liked it (and there was a lot of them), personally I never really got into it. I think also some of Samuel Beckett's work would have one or ...


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It is possible. How, I know not, but it is possible. I once wrote a story that was literally a narration of events with no character, and the community (it was a fan fiction) really liked it. I still don't know how that happened. A character did appear later on, but there was no character development. The closest it got was when the character almost ...


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You can always have a character who doesn't develop; flat Disney villains come to mind. But the flat character is generally in opposition to the hero/ine, who does develop. So the question is, why would you write such a story? What could possibly happen in it? If you have one character, period, and that character doesn't develop, what is that person doing? ...


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Is it possible? Probably. It may depend on the definition of "character development". I was just looking for a definition and didn't find one in 30 seconds, but it's normally understood to mean (a) revealing the nature of a character to the reader, and/or (b) a character growing and changing over the course of the story. By definition (a), if you write, ...


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Anything is possible in writing. There may be quality issues though. Wait, let me get this straight. You want to write a single story with one static character total? You could, but I can only think of one other story that a single character and thats Hatchet by Gary Paulsen and that was a dynamic character.


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It is not about characters in mystery/thrillers specifically, but Orson Scott Cards Characters & Viewpoint is considered by many (myself included) to be one of the best books on the subject. For a more general description of character develpoment in a plot i highly recommend Larry Brooks' Story Engineering


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As others have said, show, don't tell. Because that advice is rather vague, however, allow me to explain. The way I understand 'show, don't tell' is 'let the reader form his own conclusions. Just make sure they are the ones he is supposed to form.' For example, you don't need to say that someone rolled their eyes in exasperation. The fact that they rolled ...



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