New answers tagged

1

You describe post-traumatic stress disorder. I would start with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV or V for psychiatry. The PTSD section isn't that long. However, I'll add "blocking it out" has been considered a medically incorrect concept for about 30 years or more and usually appears sophomoric in fiction. (It is, of course, possible to forget ...


1

What, in the end, are you asking? You have planned out parts of the story: your protagonist blocking an incident and that incident 'defines her character and life choices'. It seems like you have decided what is going to happen whatever. Yet you want information that is believable without you having to take the trouble to 'dive too deeply into psychological ...


1

I had a friend whose mother remembered being fed human flesh as a child. This was late in WW2 in Holland, at time when everyone was starving and many died. She was a cheerful older lady. If she was traumatized by it, it didn't show. In real life, people react in many different ways. Some find it easier to take things in their stride. Others might be ...


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The characters should start the story with a need --probably subconscious --for someone in the opposite role. The son-figure may not think he needs a father, but he's in desperate of advice, guidance, a male role model. The father figure may have been running from the commitment a family represents, but he's keenly feeling how empty his life is. If ...


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Part of the reason we read is to learn. When Superman stops a bullet with his bare hands, it doesn't really teach us anything. But if Superman overcomes his own pride and arrogance, we might glean something useful from that. In general, if a character successfully and believably overcomes a challenge we also might face, that is compelling. And even a ...


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Realism is just another style, fiction is never reality. With that said, unrealistic characters can make it harder to suspend disbelief, identify with the characters or care about them, regardless of genre. If you are discarding realism, you need to have a good reason. Most adults don't find characters and plots that are pure wish-fulfillment to be very ...


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Relationships are contrived. They are contrived by the people in them. They are formed because one of the parties sets out, more or less deliberately, with more or less forethought, to create the relationship. In other words, relationships are the result of courtships. We are social creatures and we court other people all the time. In many cases, the ...


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The “Fantasy” genre is stories that are “fantastical” — not stories that are unrealistic wish-fulfillment. If I write a book where the main character is a total loser who wins the lottery and travels the world dating the most beautiful people, that is not a “Fantasy” genre book. That story has wish-fulfillment but it is not fantastical. If the characters ...


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Give him a totally unexpected hobby or interest that seems at first to be antithetical to his character. For example, if he loves to bake in his spare time, or likes to do Karaoke on the weekends, that reminds us not to assume we know everything about him. What other unexpected traits might he have? Don’t be afraid to give him typical flaws. A character ...


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Have them face the worst possible moment of their lives together. For example, if they were in an earthquake and got trapped in the basement of a building, just the two of them, with no way to call for help and limited food and water and the air running out and both are injured in some way … if they get out of that together, they will be each other’s ...


3

Research is surely the way to go. An even deeper alternative would be to lose your hearing, not forever of course. Just wear protective earplugs or some gear of that sort, and try interacting with your family/friends for more than a week. You'll get first hand experience to how it feels to be suddenly isolated from the world of sounds. You may vocally get ...


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This depends a lot on the context of course (not to mention the genre, if applicable), but try to see it from as a realistic perspective as possible - if indeed your goal is to make it appear natural. How do people get closer in real-life? Sociological causes: When they have to be united against something else. There is an element of tribalism involved, ...


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There should be a natural draw between them, as if they would normally be friends. If the younger character has a backstory similar to the older character or someone the older character cares/cared about, that would help. The "father" role is very tough to build with a stranger, but mentor or "uncle" is easier. Keep in mind bonds are formed through shared ...


2

There's no substitute for research. Either find a deaf group in your area or contact a national group, or possibly Gaulladet University, and start talking to people.


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Make the older guy more forgiving. Make the older guy more forgiving. Long story short, the older man doesn't want the kid to drive fast. But he is in charm, drives fast, and got into some huge trouble with some rich guy. But instead of beating him up, he tries to ease his pain, etc., you can do whatever you like, from sci-fi to horror or old time.


2

I think this part is a problem: His friends understand what he has been through whilst in prison, so they would not be unreasonably antagonistic towards him in order to make him leave them so abruptly. People are usually too much in their own heads to be that understanding of someone else's experiences. And why make them so understanding if it ...


1

I've never heard of Ulysses. I'd suggest you write everything down, even if it contradicts itself. Then you work on fixing it when you edit. Whatever you do, DO NOT BECOME PARALYZED IN A BOG OF DOUBT! Cheers.


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There's a thing called Stockholm syndrome, where one gains sympathy towards his/her captives. Perhaps it is something in his/her backstory, or maybe he/she has been kept in captivity for so long. Maybe you can implement this with your character. Another way to go is to have a previous truth stated by this potential-darksider or one of his/her friends ...


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I'd pick a few things and highlight them. Like, at the beginning of the story the characters arrive in this culture and comment to each other about some strange custom. Like, "Wow, these strange people wear socks with sandals. Why would anyone do that?" Then later you mention one of the characters putting on socks and sandals. If you want to be subtle ...


1

This happens all the time in the real world. Immigrant populations are constantly having to assimilate with new groups of people. Most families have stories about odd things their grandparents or great grandparents did or words they used that were from the old country. It's likely that you won't have to work too hard to find someone close to you that is ...


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I'd say you just describe the details of the transition. It might help to look at how "going native" is handled by other authors. For example, James Clavell's Shogun (sailor becomes samurai), or Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land (human raised by aliens adjusts to Earth), or Kipling's Jungle Book (boy raised by wolves and animals (eventually) encounters ...


2

There might be something deeper than the story. Perhaps something has bothered him as a unanswered question for most of his adult life. It's not been life changingly significsnt, but it has bothered him to some extent. Perhaps the villain knowingly or unknowingly tapped into this frustration and gave him hope for the first time that the question could be ...


1

I'm assuming that after getting bust out of jail the authorities will be looking for him? He could have a close call with getting caught amd then tell his friends it's better they split up as he doesn't want them to get caught and go to prison as well. If you don't want the brush with the law he could just tell them that anyway and leave, or leave them a ...


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There isn't nearly enough mathematics around here. Let's try some. Consider the extreme case, where every time you write a chapter, or go back and edit a chapter you break the logic of the chapter before it. Suppose your book will be 100 chapters in length and each new chapter or each edit takes up all of your writing time that day. After chapter three, ...


3

Every writer has a different process. Here's what works for me. While thinking about the project before I start writing, I make notes about what I want to do and where I want to go. Some people work from an outline, but I never do. I simply work from a feeling about the characters and the story. When I am writing, I make sure to keep a set of notes about ...


3

If you are a discovery writer, this is part of your process. Just get it all on the page and keep writing; you'll finish when you finish. However, it is then part of the first draft that you must go back and sort it out from beginning to end and make sure it's a coherent whole. Writing "the good parts" is fun and keeps you motivated. As long as you accept ...


3

Like many answers in life: it depends. I'm not sure how Ulysses works, but I imagine it can splice/paste ideas, keep virtual notecards, and whatnot Some writers draw out long outlines and try to roughly stick with them while others rely on stream-of-consciousness storytelling, at least for the first draft. It is also OK to do something in between. ...


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Good storylines are about overcoming challenges, not exposition. Amnesia as a plot device tends to be trite and overdone, however, that does not mean it can't be used effectively. The recent US TV show Blind spot uses the idea of a "drug" that washes away all of a person's memories except for flash bits to good effect. Realistically in a longer story, it ...



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