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5

Create a turning point, a defining event for this character, with elements of trauma. Here's an example: John is as stable as a rock, he's very trustworthy and everyone at work depends on him. Nothing seems to scare him. Until, one evening, on his way home, he witnesses a young boy mugged by gangsters. This triggers a memory that was buried in his ...


4

I think you are oversimplifying a complex issue. And it is complex because humans are complex beings. You can't compare two human beings in a general way, and therefore you can't make the claim that a MC is similar/better/worse than the intended reader - another assumption: is the intended reader a single person? At best, what you can do is present a ...


4

I'm not sure where we got the notion that readers have to identify with the main character. We are one of the most narcissistic societies of recent memory but we are still interested in people other than ourselves. We do still read about characters who are interesting even though (or even because) they are not like us. I think there are four kinds of appeal ...


2

What do readers want? The protagonists of the most popular and bestselling books all start out as similar to their readers. They are normal people, leading normal lives, and have problems that the readers can identify with.Make your characters similar to your readers. The protagonists of the most popular and bestselling books all achieve their dreams. They ...


1

I think the answer is in your question --you want to give this character room to grow. In that case, make the original version of this character the endpoint of the new version. No one starts out life having it all together. This is basically the "prequel version" of the character, showing how he or she learned to become the strong, independent person ...


1

You can rewrite him, but you can also look for other areas the character you have can impove. Is he independant? That can lead to arrogance, boldness; so teach him humility. Is he strong? Not everything is resolved through strength of arms. Make him face situations where his power is useless. Situations he is unfit for, more generally. And there you'll find ...


1

sure, why not? I think as long as there is some coherent structure behind the character so that you can establish that this person would behave in thus-and-such a way, and it's consistent and credible, the nature of that structure is up to you. MBTI, Jungian, RPG alignment, personality quizzes — use whatever tool or combination of tools works for you. ...


1

I agree with mbakeranelecta, but what I want to say is too long for a comment so let me write it as it's own answer. Personally, I've never understood the concept of "a hero that the reader can identify with". I guess there are readers out there who want such stories. I never did. I remember when I was a kid, there was a TV show that was advertised all the ...


1

Whether your main character (MC) is similar to or better than a particular reader depends largely on your intent. If your intent is to have the reader identify with the MC, then you should strive for similar to. However, if you want to motivate the reader, creating a MC that is better than the reader is likely preferable. In addition, different genres of ...


1

Do not make him perfect, however, I think readers need someone to look up to. If you take Bridget Jones - she is more real and amazing than any of the perfect goddesses of most paperback novels. It's because she has flaws, we women recognize in ourselves. Most important of all is that your character should be in trouble the entire time - and being imperfect ...


1

Part of the reason we read is to learn. Fiction places us in scenarios we might never encounter in real life, but we can still learn life lessons from them. In order to best learn from a character we need to a) perceive ways in which we are like that character, b) sometimes see the character making mistakes that we can thus learn to avoid, c) sometimes see ...


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This is at least the third question you've posted about revealing the name of a character. I think you're obsessing over this tiny point way too much. Just give him a name and be done with it. Most stories start out identifying the main characters' names in the first few paragraph, usually in a totally nonchalant way. Often at least one main character is ...



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