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20

Games Industry Possibly the most creative industry that you can write for. This is displayed through the excellent storyline in the Assassin's Creed series. It consists of a dual storyline that spans throughout the history of mankind (Due to their excellent implementation of the sci-fi mechanism combined with historical emphasis on events.) If you read ...


16

Writing is mostly a long-term profession. For most professional writers, writing is a long-term prospect. You are unlikely to make much money from one book, or five. Of course, unlikely is not the same as impossible. What makes a professional career work: A reader reads one of your books, enjoys it, searches for another one, and finds one. So to make a ...


14

Cover letters are tricky, because if you're writing a CL for a traditional job you're probably competing with somewhere between 50 and 300 other applicants. This means HR has to find a fast way of filtering the wheat from the chaff. Your resume is generally the first thing an HR person looks at. If you make it past the first screening, your cover letter may ...


13

I've been a computer industry journalist for most of the past 20 years, and I can assure you that it's plenty creative. This isn't "tech writing" in the sense of describing how to use a product, but rather offering useful advice (such as "which of these tools is worth your money" or "here's some tips on how to use it well") that offer LOTS of opportunities ...


13

Officially, the reason to incorporate is to protect your personal assets if someone decides to sue you over your writing. If you're incorporated, they would instead have to sue the corporation, and your personal property can't be touched. My own reason for incorporating was to get access to only-somewhat-ridiculously-priced health insurance. Buying health ...


12

First, a disclaimer: I'm not a novelist, not by a long shot. I've written some (local award winner) short stories as a teenager and I'm working on my first novel, but that's it. On the other hand, I've been practically born an engineer :) Having said that, I guess there are many different approaches to writing, as many as there are people. As a programmer ...


11

Firstly, you need to make a living so you can eat, pay the bills, and support yourself. If you like the job, and enjoy programming, take the job. Being able to support yourself from just your writing from word go is a tall order indeed; I don't think there are many writers out there that are able to do that from their first book. Secondly, having a job ...


10

Your writing career will only end if you stop writing. Period. So don't stop writing. You may not have as much time as you want, or as much as you think you need. But don't stop. Write at night, write on the weekend, write over lunch. If you want it badly enough, don't look for excuses to stop writing. Look for excuses to continue writing.


9

Don't look at it as ending your career. Think of it more as gaining more real-world experience to enrich your writing. Maybe you'll go through something that you can apply to your story. I've found that through working in an area that's not writing (in IT as well) I meet people and learn many things that have helped my writing and understanding of my plots ...


9

Write. Write a lot. And then write some more. Though your daughter may be a very good writer, it's pretty unlikely that she's going to write anything publishable at her age. So the best thing for her to do would be to just write whatever she wants, and work on getting experience and effort. Focus on finishing things and getting breadth of experience. Try ...


8

There are about 1,000 times more English majors in the US than there are jobs in anything such a degree could prepare you for. If you are one of the few who will make a living from writing, you are talented enough that you can afford to major in something else and pursue your writing as a minor, or through electives, or outside university altogether. If ...


7

What characteristics of the coder mind set lend themselves to writing fiction well, and which ones are a hindrance? I've found a systematic approach and the skills that go with it can help. My fiction writing process includes: a design phase: I start with an elevator pitch, then a plot summary, then some sample scenes, etc documentation: I make a lot ...


7

At the high levels of the hacker ranks, I've found many polymaths. In these cases, at least, there isn't really a transition from coder to novelist. One just gets tacked on without altering the other. :) My advice is to just jump in the same way you do to any new area of endeavor: look at work product (fiction) you like and try to figure out what makes it ...


6

From talking to people in the classes I took the following 3 creative writing programs came up repeatedly: Sarah Lawrence College University of Iowa Columbia University I never had the money or time to go back for an creative writing degree but I found a lot of good teachers at the Gotham Writers Workshop. They also have online classes. From experience ...


6

Like others have said, if writing is truly something you want to do, you can find time to do it. Lunch, breaks, nights (stay up an extra hour). Any time you go to turn on the TV, stop and ask, "why aren't I writing instead?" I'm also a software developer, and I have a wife and three young kids, but I've been able to write nearly 60,000 words on my first ...


6

You may not like this suggestion, and it may not necessarily work financially, but it's an idea that I'm seriously considering: how about temporarily picking up a manual labor job, like washing dishes or bagging groceries? Instead of thinking of manual labor as being menial work for the uneducated, you could think of it as being thinking time, free from the ...


6

Download a random ebook from Amazon, or read a random blog, and you will see that most writers are not ready for prime time. (In the old days, they got screened out by agents and publishers, so this wasn't so obvious.) It's not that most writers are awful (although some are), but they fall short in critical areas. Their writing is charming, but hokey. Or ...


5

Unfortunately- no. A ROI would suggest that just the "skills" learned are the only skills needed. If one intends to be a "writer" there are considerations such as "creativity" and being in "the right place at the right time" that the MFA doesn't even attempt to teach. Yes, the same could be said for other degrees but the fact of the matter is that a ...


5

Define Your Goals. "Breaking into professional writing" is a very loose definition. It could mean somebody who's only ever published a single book or a single short story; it could be somebody who publishes regularly but is widely held in low esteem; it could be somebody who self-publishes eBooks through Amazon; it could be a respected journalist or a guy ...


5

You've gotten plenty of negative answers here, which, I am sad to say, are accurate. The unfortunate truth is that writing is a horribly unrewarding profession. The fact of the matter is that, no matter how you slice it, most writers do not make enough money to support themselves from their writing. And when I say most writers, I mean literally ALMOST ALL ...


4

I think you're in a bit of a bind here. I think you'll have an easy time getting "does this work for you?" feedback, which is crucial. However, I think you'll find it very difficult to find constructive, "here is how you can make your letter awesome" feedback. Let me explain. You're trying to be attention-grabbing and evocative. Notice that this is ...


4

If she has a book that she feels has potential, then she should try sending it out to any agents that might be accepting manuscripts. At the very least she may be able to get some constructive feedback on what she has written and perhaps even some guidance on where to go from here. I'm not sure that I would encourage her to provide her age, because there is ...


3

Great question. I'm actually working on a MA in Writing Popular Fiction at Seton Hill University, and I'll graduate in June. My thesis is a horror novel approx 80,000. In the space of 18 months, I completed two drafts. I started my second revision (third draft) last night. Did the transition from coder to novelist come as a result of laborious study and ...


3

There is space for creativity in explaining complex computer technologies with real-world analogies. This, besides a good explanation to the wannabe technology adopter, can serve as a communication vehicle to the whole multidisciplinary teams. Think talking about a pizza delivery instead of event driven web servers. talking about cars and lanes instead ...


3

Well, the company I work for has a writer on staff to do revisions to site content, create whitepapers, write press releases, etc. If by 'creative' you mean fiction, then the answers dealing with Games are correct. If by 'creative' you mean original, then you can certainly put those skills to use building marketing material or blog entries relating to ...


3

There is definitely a growing market for software based books. Take Alice in Wonderland on the iPad for instance. Granted that's a rendition of an existing book, but these kinds of stories will be coming forth more in the future. However, if all you want is a chance to use your creative mind, look at startups. Even if it's standard business software, ...


3

First of all, you ought to understand that outside of professional degrees, engineering degrees, and a few others masters degrees are often a negative return on investment - they cost more than they benefit. Make sure to do a careful analysis before deciding on such a degree, or have a cash flow source that you're willing to spend for little return. If you ...


3

An MFA would come in handy when working in the publishing world. A lot of editors for publishing houses have MFAs and even owners of publishing houses occasionally have them. I know at least one of the editors at the primary house I work for has one and I'll be pursuing an MFA myself. Not only does the experience often help editors, it gives the publishing ...


3

I think to some extent, you CAN simplify it the same way as for an MBA, because there are so many other (free or low cost) ways to improve your writing. So what does the program offer, other than the letters? I guess it gives structure and discipline. There ARE other ways to improve your writing, but maybe some writers want to be given assignments and ...


3

No one was ever published strictly because they had an MFA. If you wish to be a writer, then writing should be your first goal. If you wish to get on as an editor somewhere, show your editing experience. An MFA may get you in the door for a low-level position in publishing, but it's more likely that you will need other connections. This question reminds me ...



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