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1

While this is, indeed, an endnote as noted by others, the part in parenthesis IS a citation. It seems to follow Chicago's endnote style: (City: Publisher, Year.) It's not pure Chicago because it doesn't include the author's name and book title in the standard format, but to me it looks like it was influenced by Chicago's style, adapted for use in the ...


3

In a novel it is conventional to start a new paragraph when you change: -- speaker (yes, every time) -- place -- time -- character -- topic You can change the 'meaning' of your text just by where you choose to place a new paragraph.


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You have already selected an answer; however, as you mentioned your book has a lot of flow to it. I'm sure you know, conventionally novels have some form of paragraph structure. You may want to think about forgoing them altogether or deliberately formulating a structure that fits your piece of writing. Consider, On The Road - by Jack Kerouac, it was first ...


3

Like all rules, only break it if you understand why it works, and you're breaking it deliberately to create an effect. Paragraphs break up the copy into more digestible chunks and make it easier to read. A paragraph can have one to a few thoughts in it, or one thought can be spread over multiple paragraphs. If you don't use paragraphs, what you're writing ...


1

Well, this is an issue perhaps related to whatever software you're using, though for the life of me, I can't imagine what that may be (everything should be standardized). Of course your question "Do I need to make use of paragraphs" confuses me - it's a question I would not expect from someone writing anything, let alone a novel. FWIW: Text on the left ...


0

this answer generated from @what's comment Basically these are endnotes. They are often used in popular non-fiction. Endnotes give the text a more "narrative" appearance, whereas footnotes distract the lay reader and confuse those without the necessary training (e.g. to deal with contradictory information). Usually pop science endnotes do not meet ...


2

Items which are in the public domain are free for use in any way. This includes works of art such as the Mona Lisa. You can get far more information about this at: http://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/public-domain/ Here's a quote from that site: If a book, song, movie, or artwork is in the public domain, then it is not protected by intellectual ...


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I don't know about a book. I think the trick would be punching the holes. You'd have to someone cut 20 or so holes, with just the right spacing and the right size. Once the holes are punched, it's not that hard to put the comb in manually. I've done it plenty of times when I wanted to add or remove pages. You just bend the comb and slide the pages on. You ...


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This is a big question. As Digital Dracula says, it's like asking, "what car should I buy?" or "How do I write music?" But to give you a starting point: It's pretty easy to self-publish these days, so you can be confidant that you can do it. Therefore, the first task is to actually write the book. When you're close to getting done, then is the time to get ...


2

If you live in America, the moment you write your first words for the story it is automatically protected under copyright law. It is quite insulting to professional publishers to think that they would want to steal your book. Honestly and integrity is the way publishers go if they want to make a good name for the company. It just isn't good businesses to ...



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