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The hardcover version is the full version of the book. It costs full price. It is sold on the first day the book is available and marketed to the most enthusiastic readers who are willing to pay full price, and who typically want the prestige and ruggedness of hardcover. It is not designed to be cheap. It’s designed to be prestigious and enduringly rugged. ...


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Prices of goods have nothing to do with cost of production. They are entirely determined by what people will pay for them. Goods that cannot be produced for less than people will pay for them simply do not get made. Hardcovers are a case of market segmentation. You have rich consumers and you have poor consumers. To maximize your return you want to sell to ...


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One important thing to do is to keep all of the popular / familiar elements that people loved about the original story (or at least reference them). Bringing back beloved characters, themes, locations or even smaller details like running jokes or minor characters with persistent motivations can help a reader feel like they're at home in the new book. ...


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It's a good idea to invent a school name if your story presents the school in a bad light. For example, if you are writing a fictional story about someone being sexually abused in class, and the school officials do nothing about it, you are moving in dangerous territory. Regardless of any disclaimer at the start of your book, people may think the events are ...


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Have a new story to tell. If you haven't planned out your overall story as a series from the beginning (that is, you deliberately set it up to be three, five, seven, etc. books), and you're just writing an additional story with the same characters, then make sure you have a reason to write something about them. Your sequel should have a beginning, middle, ...


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It's your book, but I'd suggest using real places for the majority. What if one of your readers were from that city, and become annoyed at inaccuracies? However, you can still get away with making a school up, as long as it's not supposed to be a well-known school. I did this in my own novel. Plop it down on a nonexistent street and done give any ...


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Yes. You can make up places. Just make sure to indicate in the foreword that everything in your writing is purely a work of fiction, especially when you use the names of famous places. Otherwise, you might confuse readers - especially the young ones - if such a place exists.


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TeiganJo, It is your book and it is your creation. You can add,create,imagine anything you want to. For your realistic imagination power you can write about real places or persons but also personify them to some other names. In a book/novel, names can be fine but what is more important is the characters and roles every entity has and relate to.


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Put simply: You can make up whatever details you want. You can use what is there when you want to and then make things up. If nothing else, the names of schools change.



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