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30

Close the intro. Promise yourself that you will write it last. Start a blank Scrivener page. Start writing down everything that comes into your head about the topic. Follow your thoughts wherever they lead, but make each thought a new line. Don't organize; just write. When you run out of steam, go back to the top of the list, look at each thought, and ...


22

This article shows an example breakdown of the costs involved in making a hardcover book: Based on a list price of $27.95 $3.55 - Pre-preduction - This amount covers editors, graphic designers, and the like $2.83 - Printing - Ink, glue, paper, etc $2.00 - Marketing - Book tour, NYT Book Review ad, printing and shipping galleys to journalists ...


14

I've seen a lot of discussion about this in a couple of different writer's forums I belong to, and I made a point of writing down a consensus that many of them seemed to reach. While the actual word counts will vary and everybody will have different opinions on what the count should be, this should help to serve as a general guide. Short story - under ...


13

TL;DR: Pick a lightweight, off-white, acid-free opaque paper (preferably book paper if it’s available). Then pick a binding to suit your budget: 3-ring and a nice binder if you’re cheap, plastic comb if you’re slightly less cheap, perfect binding if you’ve got a couple of bucks or professional bookbinding if money is no object. From just printing it off and ...


11

I wrote four such books. My first one was 750 pages. The others ranged from 250-400 pages each. My technique was to budget a particular number of pages or a particular amount of time each day to write. For myself, I found that if I wrote more than about 4 pages per day (6 on a good day, it varied), I would quickly get burned out. That's 2000-3000 words. ...


10

It's hard to say; length is usually measured by word count and not page count or thickness. Layout and font choice can change the number of pages a book has without changing the length of it. That being said, I believe 50,000 words is still the minimum to scratch by as a novel, though most run between 75k and 100k words of late, though it used to be ...


9

I think having an outline solves all three questions you pose. In reverse order: If you are not a "discovery writer," then YES, you need an outline. In fact, you should be getting a beta or two to look over your outline and bat that around for a while before even writing anything. You may have a few vague points ("John and Gertrude meet and discuss Oscar's ...


9

If you want to obtain the copyright for any artwork, you must put it in writing. Otherwise, the artist will retain copyright, while you will merely have a license to use the artwork in the book for which they were created, and the artist may bar you from using the artwork in other books, or even other editions of the same book. Your contract should ...


9

In answer to the first question, you need to keep in mind that each book has different terms that are negotiated between the writer and the publisher. In some cases, the publisher will purchase first print rights or first US print rights. This means that they have the right to publish the works before anyone else. Generally, once this has happened, there is ...


8

At the risk of trying to answer the unanswerable I will share with you something I have discovered over the course of my various writings. Writing is a bit like building a bridge from one side of a chasm or other deep precipice to the other. By yourself. For this reason beginnings are tricky, middles have their ups and downs and ends are hard. You can ...


8

I have a hunch: The endings are not satisfying. When that's true, there's nothing for the second half of the novel to build toward. If that's true, then perhaps the problem is not structure per se, but the ending. And if that's true, there's a good chance that the beginning somehow doesn't lend itself to a satisfying ending. In my experience, three things ...


8

There are almost no rules which have "no exceptions." (Which ones are the "no exceptions" is an exercise left to the student.) Your writing tends to be flowy and lyrical. Tightening it up does add some motion and spark to it. I wouldn't tighten everything, because sometimes you want "flowy and lyrical." I think tightening in general is a good thing, but ...


7

In the initial stages I think you have to free yourself from the notion that you are meant to be producing anything that will resemble your finished book. As you are writing a non-fiction volume you will, of necessity, exist in an eco system of non-fiction works which surround the topic of your work. At this stage it is not inappropriate to re-read and ...


7

You might not get the publicity you're looking for from these kinds of sites. Many don't have focus or the eyeballs that make giving away your product a good financial decision. Genre sites for genre books, are a good exception to that though. This article spells it out better and has some advice on getting some real reviews in real publications.


7

I see no reason for concern. The two words don't look the same, or even really sound the same. I don't see any reason anybody would get the two confused, certainly not on a scope that should worry you. Maybe if your novel gets turned into a multimillion dollar film, "Taiwan Sick" could be the title for the MAD Magazine lampoon :P Now, this isn't what you ...


7

I agree with the spirit of Kate's answer, but it glosses over an important point. Ultimately, it doesn't matter what you are describing as long as it's interesting and adds to the story. If you are writing a romance and the characters' mundane setting is what they are trying to break away from with their affair, then it is important the reader understands ...


7

There is only one question you need to ask when considering whether to include anything in a book: will the reader find some use for it? Is it entertaining and/or interesting? If so, put it in. If it's more a chance for you to show off how much research you did, but the reader will not care one whit, leave it out. Or at least leave it for later -- when the ...


7

Book titles are often duplicated quite by accident, and there is pretty much no way of preventing other people from publishing a book with the same title. It happens all the time, and as long as the title isn't something trademarked (like something in the Star Wars universe), it's generally not a problem. I'd recommend you concentrate on writing the book, ...


7

After about fifteen minutes research, I couldn't find an authoritative answer for this. I suspect there's a good reason for this, however: At counts in the tens of thousands, the answer doesn't make much difference. For example, you have a 50,000 word book (by raw body text count). Let's say the work has 100 headings, averaging 6 words each. Even ...


7

That depends (a) on your level of professionalism and (b) on the necessary research. Some topics need a lot of preparation, and some authors spend months or years to research into the background of their writing. Some authors have a good idea, plan well and write printable prose, so they finish a thousand pages in a few weeks. Others need to restructure, ...


6

LibraryThing is a good source for this. They have regular book giveaways where authors can specifically request a review in exchange of the book itself. This will work with a print copy or an e-book. With Goodreads, they only do giveaways with print copies. I have used LibraryThing with both of my fantasy novels and gotten some reviews as a result. The ...


6

Are there standardized sizes? The mass market paperback appears to be standardized in North America at 4.25" x 6.75". Some of the other economical standard North American sizes: Trade Paperback 5.5" x 8.5" 6.0" x 9.0" Textbook 7.0" x 10.0" Large 8.5" x 11.0" Reference There does seem to be some evidence that a larger mass market ...


6

I've seen the citation "(—ed.)" short for "editor," meaning "the editor added this on top of what the author wrote." The format is something like TEXT One of the best-known quotes from Star Trek is "Scotty, beam me up!"(1) This basic command has become a cultural meme, and occasionally a frustrated commuter's lament. FOOTNOTE (1)Although much like ...


6

If I understand you, you are writing a book and you have both your own citations and quoted material with citations and you want to distinguish the two types of citations. Is this correct? I don't see much need to distinguish them -- they are all just reference material, put them all in the end-notes (I hate numbered foot-notes personally, they're very ...


6

Perfection is your foe. If there is anyone out there, who thinks the stuff in historical novels is 100% percent accurate, then I pity him. Research is often a scattergun approach. Keep writing and if a detail is wrong, so what? No-one will crucify you for that. You should tell a good story and sometimes you have to tweak reality/history to do so. Don't ...


6

I've been thinking about this site lately, and I think this question is one of the ones that illustrates why the site isn't totally satisfying to me. Because the answer to this question, as to so many other questions, is: It depends. What works for you? I really don't think that writing, at least fiction writing, is a science. It's a craft for some, an ...


6

Usually a writer will include books that they either read or referred to as part of their research for their own book. Even though they may not quote specific passages from the original source, they are making sure that the reader knows that they had to seek additional information on one or more topics within their own book. They are not necessarily ...


6

You are trying to do too much at once. You're flailing around in a cloud. The easiest way for me to get out of the cloud is to start asking and answering hard, definable questions, and completing hard, definable tasks. Create and define a character. Decide what you want the character to do. Give the character a reason or reasons for doing it. Start the ...



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