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14

For inconsequential changes you can just edit it. For anything substantial ("I meant to say I disagree with..."), I've often seen an explicit notation: "Edited to add: ..." "Edit: ...", or the like. If there have been relevant comments, you can include a timestamp for the edit so people will see it was after the comment. This is what I do.


11

When in doubt, ask yourself: "Would my readers care if they didn't know about this change? Would they think I was trying to deceive them by not pointing it out?" If the answer to either of these is yes, note the change. If not, and you're simply making the reading experience smoother and better, make the change and leave it be. I agree with Monica's ...


9

The rules are changing, which makes it a bit hard to be sure what the hell the rules currently are. Posting on your blog counts as publication. The traditional rule was definitely that, for fiction at least, most publishers want first publication rights, and you'd be blowing those rights by posting on your blog. Is that still the rule? I think it is, for ...


8

In response to Is it coherent? and Is there an overall sense of clarity?, I think you've got a lot of problems that boil down to simple formatting, spellchecking, and proofreading. These make the piece much more difficult to read and understand. Among the problems I noticed: You should use a spell checker. "atleast" is not a word, "I" is upper-case, and ...


8

I think the main problem is that your article, and the stylistic choices you make to write it, are all setup and no payoff. The first half, which actually is setup and is where you frame the problem, isn't too bad. A neat historical anecdote, a build up that walks the reader though, and deeper, into the problem, topped off with a suspense-building capper - ...


8

It depends on what your blog is trying to achieve. I agree with this much of your quote: readers come back most consistently to a blog that is focused, that offers one thing consistently. The reason is that, the more you switch around the key element of your blog posts, the less likely each individual post is to be enjoyed by a regular reader. But two ...


7

In English "brain" typically refers to the organ itself. The gray and white matter; the neurons. You probably want to say that we train our minds. In English, the mind is what controls our thoughts, feelings, and emotions. The brain is merely the vehicle for our cognitive processes. I don't know if other languages account for the difference between the ...


7

You can engage your writing with other writers by not just having your own blog, and hoping others will comment there, but to seek out other blogs of interest written by others, and comment there as well. If you have useful and interesting things to say, this can act to draw people back to your own "personal corner of the web" -- still the commenting is more ...


7

If you have that many important points, make them a bulleted list instead of making them bold. They will stand out without being overwhelming. Blockquote is used to quote a big block of text, as opposed to quoting one or two sentences. You don't.


7

The contributors own the copyright to the content unless they assign it to you in some form. Submission may or may not constitute permission for you to use the content. It certainly does not assign you exclusive copyright to the content. To prevent the contributors from claiming their contents, ask them to assign you exclusive rights for whatever duration ...


7

Writing a lot is good for writers. The more you write the better writer you become. No matter what you write. If you write blogs, that's just fine. Still, there are problems no amount of writing will help - just opposite, it will make them rooted harder. If you keep making a certain mistake, lots of writing won't help against it. Lots of reading may help. ...


7

Downsides: It's unprofessional. They are usually teenager level style. Most of them are repeated ad nauseam. Reposting an old meme is boooring. Trying to fit them in for the sake of having them in is a really pathetic attempt at being hip. Upsides: It can liven up a text. It can be really memorable and funny if done right. It can really drive a point ...


6

On bolding: Assume that on a casual browse, the reader's eye will always leap first to headers, and to words in bold. They'll help him understand the structure of your piece, and the most important bits. Here's a simple example - the bolded opening lines give structure, and a few key concepts are bolded to stand out immediately. Drinking MegaPop is bad ...


5

One of the primary challenges you may be faced with in trying to compile your boh entries into a book format lies in organizing your content. Will you list the content in the order in which it was written, group it by topic, arrange it according to a theme, or just randomize it? If you can figure out that answer, then you'll have a good start on deciding ...


5

There are no real rules. From my perspective there are two major keys to doing edits right. Firstly you should remember to be as transparent as possible. Secondly you should pick a method of doing edits that is consistent and maintained so people learn what to expect. I personally add edit notes to everything when I edit. The other answers here are all ...


5

Ultimately, this is going to be a personal choice for you. There are a couple things you could think about when making your decision: Do you have the time to write two blogs? Are you proficient enough in English to write a blog with minimal errors where native speakers won't have many problems understanding you? Is it worth the effort you'll need to put into ...


5

This started short, and then got long pretty quickly. Feel free to use as many of my suggestions as you want, or none at all. :) 1) First off, I find your site VERY hard to read. White on black works for a small group of people, but dark on light is more universally accessible according to every usability study... ever. I also had trouble distinguishing ...


5

Even though Kate mention valid points, I have a different point of view: The rules have not changed and probably will never. Traditional publishers want to make money. If they think your writing will make money, they publish it, no matter if you have already published on your blog. Yes, they will tell you, that blog publishing is a problem, and if they ...


5

1) Leave comments: There are many film review blogs. Comment under their reviews. Like: "Interestingly, we have really different view on quality of the movie. some detail from your review" Btw, The comments should be on topic, interesting and not bragging ones. Everyone hates "hey, visit my awesome blog!" comment 2) Do giveaways and promos Do you have ...


5

switch(NumberOfMemes){ case 1: result="This might liven a dull post."; break; case 2: result="If the first one did not work, take it out."; break; default: result="If you want a picture gallery, stop calling it a blog."; }


5

As I see it, getting paid for reviews can be broken down into different scenarios: You work for someone that pays you to review other products i.e. you're being paid by a neutral party with no affiliation to the product itself. You are approached by someone with a vested interest in the product, and are either paid to review that product, or get given the ...


5

An important consideration is that in the US, the FTC requires clear disclosure of paid reviews by bloggers. Both the advertiser and the blogger may be held liable if the blogger does not disclose that the review was paid. From ...


4

I have the same problem, Hebrew being my native language. I chose to blog in English, because by blogging in Hebrew I limit my audience to those who can read the language. I believe that by using English you will address a larger audience. Writing two copies of the same blog entry will probably tax you to the point in which you will drop one language, or ...


4

I think the actual content and overall style is fine, but you're having some trouble with consistent grammar. For example: "We train our brain hard so that we are able to control the burst of our emotions." - we don't share a common brain. So it should be 'brains'. Or: "impulsive acts often causes troubles" should be 'cause', since acts is plural. And ...


4

Frequency - as often as you need it. Quantity of words - whatever number you need to make your point. Each of these are separate variables that are going to change depending on the topic, the objective you hope to reach with your post, and the audience. There are so many factors that come into play when it comes to starting up and maintaining a successful ...


4

You cannot post any copyrighted material for which you do not have copyright. But, you can provide links to those materials from your blog. If you really need to publish, then better ask for a written permission from the original author or the person who holds the copyright. Just because something is available in multiple places on internet does not ...


4

Writing a blog may be less useful than reading the work of others and analysing what they have done and why. Ask yourself "Would I have written that in that way?" While you do want to develop a distinctive style that is not simply a copy of everyone else, individuality is no justification for repeating the same errors.


4

You are asking for opinion, and this, I believe, is offtopic on this site. But as long as your question stands, here is my opinion: In this time and age, grabbing money wherever you can, is the norm. Not taking money, when you can, is generally considered stupid. So you should. Everybody does. Fooling the customer is not unethical, otherwise advertising ...


3

I've been an on-again, off-again writer for Ars Technica for nearly ten years. (Mostly off for the last four.) Periodically, they solicit submissions from new writers, usually in a few specific subject areas. I don't know that video games is one of them, because Ben, Casey, and Andrew seem to have that on lockdown both in terms of volume and quality. And ...


3

Books compiling previously-published articles are not new. The usual challenges there are selecting and organizing your material and editing it for a different audience. Compiling material that is still readily available (blog posts) adds one more challenge: how do you induce people to pay for what they can get for free? I have bought books that ...



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