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7

Writing biographies like these for a mass audience will require that the reader understand the subject's work. This can be handled by long expository passages, or, as is more frequently done, concepts can be broken up into small, easily digestible pieces. These can alternate with the story of the subject's life, information provided to the reader only as is ...


5

This is called quoting from an indirect source. And, yes, if you don't take your quotations from the original source, you need to acknowledge the intermediary. This is in part to recognize the work that person did, but also to protect yourself in case that person misquoted the original source. I don't know the audience for your work, so I don't know which ...


4

In order to make scientific work accessible to the non-scientist, you need to connect it to something within the experience of your audience. The personal life of the researcher is a very popular vehicle for this but not the only one available. Look to the events of the world in which he worked to provide the thread that might otherwise come from his ...


4

I would abbreviate your degrees; chances are your audience will understand them. And then I would break down a few of your sentences into shorter sentences. Here's an edited version (impressive resume by the way!): Andrew earned his BS and MBA from the University of New Mexico and his MS in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. He primarily ...


4

Unless you are near (what you think is) the end of your life, you don't have enough data yet to know what will ultimately be the best organization. So don't try to create an outline; just start writing pieces. Chronological seems logical but might not be very engaging. Is reading a day-by-day (or week-by-week) diary where not a lot happens at once ...


4

My advice is to find some element (with an emotional content) that changed across your life and put down a list. The goal is to have an outline of major events. Then fill the gaps between those "milestones". For me, a list of girlfriends worked pretty well (without turn out to be a book about my sex life). Everything could be suitable for the purpose (like a ...


3

If it were me I would just start writing without any sort of outline or rules. I would write whatever I felt at the moment and as little or as much as I was moved to write. Once you have a lot written it will be obvious to you how it should be organized in the book. As with any large project that is overwhelming at first I get nowhere until I just start ...


3

I would use "lessened" for "smallen" here, and add a comma after "since then", to make it clearer. Also, switch "haven't" for "hasn't". My enthusiasm for emerging technologies hasn't lessened since then, not even for a bit. Also, in the sentence after that, "look-out" is grammatically correct but feels a bit weird there, but I'm not sure I can put my ...


2

I don't know if the rules for citing from speech are any different from those of citing from text, however, if you are to cite something or someone verbatim, you need to put it in quotes, if not also as a separate paragraph. In cases where the article/object of the quote is tacit, you may place it in square brackets as part of the quote. This also applies ...


2

Well, chronological is always a useful way of telling this sort of story, but it might not be the most engaging. As strange as it sounds, even a biography has to have a story. Sometimes the best way to do this is start it at a singular event, then go back to see how you came to that point. The idea is to show how your life molded you into the person that you ...


2

Be free and honest in what you did, unless you committed an extremely serious offence - murder, serious fraud, rape - because your writing does not, as a rule, constitute a formal confession. The police would have to find other evidence that you committed the crime to make it worth their while investigating - with acts like drug taking or public lewdity, ...


1

I don't have the exact term for the style, but the one autobiography that I still think about (even though I am not a writer) is Stephen King's 'On Writing'. He started with his childhood and the further you've read, more of each page became about the art of writing and less about what other bios I read contain - unabashed chivalry, heroic deeds, monumental ...


1

As mentioned in comments this question has been addressed before but as a fellow writer I cannot resist talking about my own experiences. I tell a lot of stories that involve my friends and family. I also (when the daylight allows) run a writer's group. An exercise I give the group is to write a description of several people in the group without using their ...


1

Rather than "deployed": helped to launch I've no idea what an "enterprise application" is, so perhaps that could be rephrased. The problem with "he is an advocate for agile software development practices" is that "agile software development" is an actual jargon phrase. If you don't want it to mess up your readability score, you have to rephrase it entirely ...


1

Here's how I'd write it, keeping in mind two things: 1.) I'm not a software developer and 2.) your audience probably is so you can use a lot more abbreviations. I can't tell you that I'm a fan of the alphabet soup but your readability score will significantly improve if your degrees, etc. are abbreviated. I've also tweaked some other bits: Andrew earned ...



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