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7

That's a hard one, because it really depends on the community you are working with in your writing. If you are already working with a writers group then you already have group of beta readers right there, just stand up and ask. If you're not part of an existing writers group it might get a bit tricky. There are always the on-line writers groups, places ...


7

You're essentially asking if it's possible for a human being to be unbiased. The answer is no, it's not. Even in the case of professional manuscript evaluators working for total strangers, there is no such thing as truly unbiased feedback. But there are ways of improving the situation. Background: "Beta reader" is an tern that just screams the words "...


4

Try YouWriteOn. Rather than me tell you how it works, this is from their About Us page: YouWriteOn began in 2006 to assist new writers to develop their writing. Editors for leading publishers such as Random House and Orion - who publish bestselling writers such as John Grisham, Bill Bryson and Ian Rankin - review our highest rated writers each month. ...


4

Critique Circle is a good source. You can easily find people who will read your work and give you feedback and suggestions. http://www.critiquecircle.com/


4

Check out scribophile.com. You have to build up your karma enough (by critiquing) in order to post your work for others to critique. But they guarantee results: Friends and family will always say your writing is great, even if it isn't. Other writing sites are full of people who only tell you "I like it" and nothing else. We're different: we guarantee at ...


3

As a previous answer mentioned, fictionpress.com is one site that offers connection to beta readers. Outside of that side though, there are plenty of places that offer beta services. Critique Circle http://www.critiquecircle.com/ is a popular writing community Tumblr has some blogs that are devoted to pairing beta readers with writers. One google search ...


2

You could try https://www.fictionpress.com/betareaders/. You'd have to have a fictionpress account, but there's a long list of betas to choose from with their list of strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes, and they are reviewed.


1

You might try Critique Circle, which is a free online critiquing community. (I haven't used it, but others here have.) If you have enough rep, you could ask in our Chat Room, the Overlook Hotel. There are a number of members here who are freelance editors who might be able to work with you.


1

Places where you can find technical writers: Society for Technical Communication - http://stc.org Your local STC chapter. Technical Writer Mailing List (TechWhirl) - http://techwhirl.com/ Write the Docs - http://www.writethedocs.org/ Technical Writing World: - http://technicalwritingworld.com/ Any number of groups on LinkedIn, Google+, etc. A local ...


1

If you offer a free license, I would ask people you know directly. Easier and more promising than online. Sites taking licenses as payment do not exist as far as I know. But there are free services out there. Maybe you want to check them: PaperRater Kibin I haven't tested any of them. Also take a look at the Startups StackExchange site.


1

You can also try Scribophile at http://www.scribophile.com. The premise is that folks earn points by critiquing and spend points to put their work up for critique. The system means that no one hogs the spotlight without helping other folks. You're pretty much guaranteed 3 critiques.


1

I will offer an acquaintance who I already know likes to read a small amount of money to read and critique a work for me--not talking about lots of $$$, maybe $10 USD to read and comment on a short story under 50,000 words. If a person is getting some sort of reward for reading and commenting, he/she will usually stick with it even if they are not ...



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