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16

Writing is mostly a long-term profession. For most professional writers, writing is a long-term prospect. You are unlikely to make much money from one book, or five. Of course, unlikely is not the same as impossible. What makes a professional career work: A reader reads one of your books, enjoys it, searches for another one, and finds one. So to make a ...


6

The problem I see with writing (and drawing) is that people believe that they should be able to do it without any training. We all learn to write in school, we all can compose a coherent narrative, for example in a letter to our grandparents or a "what I did during the summer holidays" essay for school, and we all have been drawing since we were able to hold ...


6

I think it is not necessary to read about writing thrillers to write them. Insted, I'd read thrillers directly, so you can see how they're written. However, you can also check these links with some advices: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Thriller-Novel http://www.creative-writing-now.com/how-to-write-a-thriller.html ...


6

Download a random ebook from Amazon, or read a random blog, and you will see that most writers are not ready for prime time. (In the old days, they got screened out by agents and publishers, so this wasn't so obvious.) It's not that most writers are awful (although some are), but they fall short in critical areas. Their writing is charming, but hokey. Or ...


5

You've gotten plenty of negative answers here, which, I am sad to say, are accurate. The unfortunate truth is that writing is a horribly unrewarding profession. The fact of the matter is that, no matter how you slice it, most writers do not make enough money to support themselves from their writing. And when I say most writers, I mean literally ALMOST ALL ...


5

Yes. When an editor rejects a story, you can revise it and submit it somewhere else. You can also submit it to another editor without revising it. Editors are human, and have individual tastes. And their slush readers are humans with individual tastes. One editor or reader may hate a story, and another love it. Further, editors tastes differ from yours, ...


4

You can publish them yourself. If you do that, you retain all of the rights to the stories and the book. That way, nobody can get the rights to the book and throw them away. To publish an ebook, you can make an epub file and distribute it through Kindle, Apple iBooks, Kobo, Nook, Smashwords, and other places. They won't steal it. They want to sell it for ...


3

You identify two problems in your question. One is "how can I effectively develop topics out of thin air without research, or spending hours before actually writing?" This is a "what to write about" question, which is not on-topic for Writers. (Plus, there's no such thing as "developing topics without research." You may have done the "research" by reading ...


3

I've found the best solution to improving creative productivity is to practice self-discipline. Discipline is also a skill, so it will take time to find a routine that works for you. Find an hour or so in which you believe you're the most productive and set it aside exclusively for writing, eliminate any distractions or commitments. Every day, go to your ...


3

Short answer: No. There are, of course, some people who become millionaires from their writing: JK Rowling, Stephen King, etc. But the vast majority of writers do not make anywhere near what you could make by devoting the same amount of energy to something really lucrative, like, say, flipping burgers at a fast-food place. If your goal is to make money, ...


2

I'm not sure whether this will work for you, but this is what I did: I started with flash fiction (900 words). Then, gradually, began writing longer pieces (3000~4000 words). At the same time, I started posting my work on this site for feedback. Also, I asked grammar questions at http://english.stackexchange.com/ (since I'm not a native English speaker, ...


2

Just write. Seriously. Just write. Stop worrying about whether it sucks (it probably will). Write it. Get it out. Because then you can go back and fix it. You can't edit a blank page. But you can take lousy text and make it better. Study materials from the time I wish my story to be set in? If it's historical in any way, yes. Research is good. ...


2

I really don't have any special advice other than to just write. Don't worry about the quality of what you put onto paper, just commit it to paper. People will say "it's probably better than you think it is" but the fact is that it will probably be pretty bad. That's okay. Everybody's first draft is bad. Writing quality prose is all about rewriting. If ...


2

Learning to write any genre of fiction is mostly the same set of skills - character exposition, scene setting, pacing, and so on. Start with the general and then move on to the specifics would be my suggestion. I don't follow the thriller genre much, but in my chosen genre (science fiction) there are a lot of popular authors who write blogs where they ...


2

I think your main problem may be that you're sitting down to write without the following: A PURPOSE Quite often, for an article, you're simply looking for an "angle". Angles don't just spontaneously come to us. We "look" for them. When I'm assigned to write about something particular, I research it, and I try to find an angle within the actual subject. I ...


1

Your main problem/complaint seems to be that your thoughts don't automatically organize themselves. Take comfort. You are normal. Try the following (in order): 1) First, just get ideas down. I like to use FreeMind for this phase, and also a spiral-bound notebook that has no purpose except to jot down ideas. Note that "jotting down an idea" can run on ...


1

The "without investing too much time" part could be a little problematic, depending on what you mean by that. In my experience (and contrary to what a lot of people believe), creativity is something you practice. That means two things: It is going to take some time to get good at. Maybe a lot of time. In this sense, there is no getting around the amount of ...


1

I think you're just worrying too much about the act of writing itself. Just have confidence in what you're doing, and sit down and enjoy yourself. Of course, you need strong fundamentals for that (sizable vocabulary, good grammar, and a knowledge of what you are writing about). If you're having trouble developing your creative skills, then I'd recommend ...


1

The most common type of question raised by would-be writers is some version of "why can't I write?" The most common type of answer is "just write." If you look through this site, you will find quite a lot of that sort of question, and that sort of answer. And it really does boil down to pretty much that. You are either going to spend a lot of time ...


1

To add on to Psicofrenia's excellent answer: Simply put, a writer writes. All the time. If you're not at your desk, you're still writing in your head. The notebook gives you somewhere to put your thoughts for later perusal. So if you're sitting at a subway station waiting for the train on the way to work, you may observe two really interesting people ...


1

Basically the idea is to take notes. Supposedly, a writer is always receiving insights of creativity and new ideas. If you have a notebook, you can write them down and not forget even if you are in the middle of street or something like that. The other function of the notebook is to collect interesting things. If you know how to draw and cross a interesting ...


1

Having books to teach you those fundamentals is great. But, perhaps you don't need a book at all if your purpose is to learn the basics. There are a lot of resources online where you can learn the building blocks of the craft of writing. Here are some websites that I find quite informative and useful: DailyWritingTips (http://www.dailywritingtips.com/) ...



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