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19

As long as you approach it with good writing practices and treat it as you would your own real writing project, it can help you practice the art of putting words on paper. What it will not prepare you for, however, is world-building, which is the other half of the battle when you write, and is just as important as your ability to write. You can be a ...


16

Writing is mostly a long-term profession. For most professional writers, writing is a long-term prospect. You are unlikely to make much money from one book, or five. Of course, unlikely is not the same as impossible. What makes a professional career work: A reader reads one of your books, enjoys it, searches for another one, and finds one. So to make a ...


15

"Pantsing" refers to simply writing a story without much, if any, preparation or pre-writing -- just writing down whatever comes to you, and letting the story go (and wander) wherever it feels like at the moment you're writing it down. As for etymology, I'm not sure where it comes from. In general, "pantsing" refers to a prank in which you pull someone's ...


12

In general, I feel that fanfic is a crutch that keeps a lot of people from honing their craft and moving on to original fiction. After years of NaNoWriMo and some side work with an editor, I've only seen one person start with fanfic and graduate to doing their own, thoroughly original work. It's like they're just too scared to ever leave their comfort ...


11

When I'm thinking about where I learned most how to write, I think that reading was the most important guide to me. This may sound silly, but by reading good written newspaper articles (facts, opinions, scientific articles and most of all, criticisms of films and music), I learned how others did the job, what works and what doesn't. In my own writing, I try ...


9

A good parody requires a similar structure and a similar melody while altering certain words and, thus, the intention of the work. In the case of the posted verse, the syllable distribution disrupts the flow of particular sentences. Hey Verve, if you could see me now | Hey ma, if could see me now "Verve" is potentially too bulky to replace the simple ...


9

Write. Write a lot. And then write some more. Though your daughter may be a very good writer, it's pretty unlikely that she's going to write anything publishable at her age. So the best thing for her to do would be to just write whatever she wants, and work on getting experience and effort. Focus on finishing things and getting breadth of experience. Try ...


8

No, you don't need to set up a business to self-publish a book. In the U.S., royalty income and all related expenses to publishing the book (e.g. paying a graphic designer to create a cover, advertising, travel expenses for a book tour, etc.) are reported on Schedule C of your personal tax return. EDIT Regarding Social Security and Medicare taxes, you ...


8

Amazon will send you a 1099 that will identify the amount of royalties that they paid you. If you are just now starting, I would strongly recommend setting aside at least 30% of everything you earn in royalties as soon as you receive it. You are now considered self-employed, and the self employment tax as 15% of your royalties, and the Social ...


7

Answer them now. They have put time into your story, at your request. Do not ask them to waste their time while you decide whether you want them to publish the story that you asked them to consider. This is why most publishers forbid simultaneous submissions. If the publisher in question allows them, give them the courtesy of a prompt reply. It sounds ...


6

In my experience, revising teaches more about good writing than anything else. Most people who are not experienced writers are putting so much effort and attention into getting something down on paper that they have no mental RAM left for phrasing and style. Instead of worrying about your friend's writing per se, offer to act as a sounding board to help by ...


6

Here are some SFF-specific resources: Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America - The professional organization for SFF writers. The website has a blog and articles about craft and business. Critters workshop - Specifically for SF, F, and H. It's a free workshop. You have to critique to post. But a great way to start would be to join and read the ...


6

The problem with fan fiction is that it will always be tied down to the source material, and can't really become more than what it is. They're a sidetrack rather than a stepping stone. Okay, to reword that first paragraph: If you are going to draw from a source material, be aware that you are creating a branch of the source material. You're creating ...


6

Screenwriting: http://www.screenwriting.info/ The Complete Idiot's Guide to Screenwriting Playwriting: http://www.scriptfrenzy.org/introtoplaywriting Writing for the Stage: A Practical Playwriting Guide


6

Download a random ebook from Amazon, or read a random blog, and you will see that most writers are not ready for prime time. (In the old days, they got screened out by agents and publishers, so this wasn't so obvious.) It's not that most writers are awful (although some are), but they fall short in critical areas. Their writing is charming, but hokey. Or ...


6

I think it is not necessary to read about writing thrillers to write them. Insted, I'd read thrillers directly, so you can see how they're written. However, you can also check these links with some advices: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Thriller-Novel http://www.creative-writing-now.com/how-to-write-a-thriller.html ...


6

The problem I see with writing (and drawing) is that people believe that they should be able to do it without any training. We all learn to write in school, we all can compose a coherent narrative, for example in a letter to our grandparents or a "what I did during the summer holidays" essay for school, and we all have been drawing since we were able to hold ...


5

I know many people who started out writing fanfiction and then turned this into the basis of a professional career. Off the top of my head, both Paul Cornell and Una McCormack both started by writing fanfic and are now professional authors. Unfortunately it can be all too easy to spend all of your time there. If you think you'll enjoy it, write fanfic by ...


5

It's a crutch. The scariest thing about writing is the idea that nobody will like (or even understand) the stories and characters you create. Writing fanfic is an attempt to dodge that risk by using stories and characters that are already well liked and well understood instead. The problem is that you never learn anything without taking a risk, and so by ...


5

I have encountered numbers of excellent fanfics out there which could stand out on their own, and be excellent works by themselves if the author just didn't constrain himself into the pre-created world. I'm not saying that you should always create your own worlds, but when you're confident about your work and people start to appreciate it, it might be a ...


5

Beyond the awesome recommendations by Elizabeth, There are a number of great books out there that might help out along the way. Writing Fiction: A guide to Narrative Craft, by Jannet Burroway - This is an awesome book that you can keep re-reading and learning new things from. Burroway sets out a series of guidelines for your prose which remain true to all ...


5

The degree is less important than your clips and prior work experience. However, journalism is very hierarchical. Bigger papers have a higher status, higher pay, better jobs, etc, and they only hire reporters with good clips, and experience at larger papers. So you're going to have to start at a smaller paper, and work your way to bigger papers. I know a guy ...


5

One of the best ways to learn is to learn from example. Get your friend to read some examples of well-written essays, paying particular attention to the language used, and construction of arguments, etc. Perhaps he/she can ask her teacher for some past examples from the course itself, or better yet, see what advice they can give related directly to the ...


5

Go to QueryTracker.net. Search for agents representing children's literature. Go to those agents' websites. Confirm that you're submitting a book in the right categories for that agent. Put together a query for the agents that you've selected, then send it out.


5

The first step is to hold back your urge to write. First do your homework, thoroughly. Learn. Learn a whole lot about the place. Start with Google StreetView and Panoramio. Proceed through Wikipedia to learn not just about the place but about landmarks, anything in the area. Find movies, amateur videos, anything to take place around there. Read blogs of ...


5

You've gotten plenty of negative answers here, which, I am sad to say, are accurate. The unfortunate truth is that writing is a horribly unrewarding profession. The fact of the matter is that, no matter how you slice it, most writers do not make enough money to support themselves from their writing. And when I say most writers, I mean literally ALMOST ALL ...


4

Reading good writing is great for learning to write (what a sentence!). Reading BAD writing is even better for learning to write. Give your friend some examples of terrible writing and ask them what makes it terrible. Writing is like book design--the better it is, the less you notice it. By reading something that is well-written, we're more likely to get ...


4

If she has a book that she feels has potential, then she should try sending it out to any agents that might be accepting manuscripts. At the very least she may be able to get some constructive feedback on what she has written and perhaps even some guidance on where to go from here. I'm not sure that I would encourage her to provide her age, because there is ...


4

Write an outline. At the very least write a sketch. So you are writing your story before you write your story. Have an idea of where it starts, what happens, and how it ends. This gives you something to hang your ideas on. Then when you feel like walking away, or you get bored, you can go over your outline and see what's supposed to happen, and pick some ...


4

Yes. When an editor rejects a story, you can revise it and submit it somewhere else. You can also submit it to another editor without revising it. Editors are human, and have individual tastes. And their slush readers are humans with individual tastes. One editor or reader may hate a story, and another love it. Further, editors tastes differ from yours, ...



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