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Technically, a "young adult" is someone aged 18 (just having reached majority), to about 25. But for books, a "young adult" audience starts at a somewhat younger age range, 12-14. That's because an audience for a genre is larger than a genre itself. Or put another way, young adult readers include not only actual young adults, but people who will soon be ...


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The paragon example, I'd say, when writing from a child's perspective in first person, in a book that is NOT for a child audience, is found in Jack Womack's Random Acts of Senseless Violence. I'd call these stylistic points Condillacian statues effects. 1) Slang and language use that is not quite formal English is necessary if the perspective character is ...


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We've all been 10, so decide on these two options: Write from the child's POV exclusively, giving readers the inside look at the character, or Write from a 3rd person POV on the child I suggest #1 because if done right, it's much stronger emotionally. However, it also depends on the story type and the content. Ultimately you'll know what's best, and ...


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Narrate the story in third person. The narrator can both tell of the boy's perspective and reflect it from an adult (or teen) viewpoint. Or let the adult look back and narrate his own childhood (in first person). That said, some famous children's or middle grade books (such as Astrid Lindgren's Brothers Lionheart, in which the ten year old protagonist ...


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Many children's books deal with difficult topics. For example, 'Two Weeks with the Queen' is about someone coping with a sibling dying (it is very sad and very funny). 'Bad Alice', a novel I have just been using with twelve years olds, is about the effects of sexual assault. A recent children's book award winner was about someone trapped in a totalitarian ...



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