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2

If it were me, I'd send the 52 pages. It would be ridiculous to trim the last two pages, and any agent who would reject you on the basis of such a tiny excess isn't worth bothering with. But if you're worried, it should be easy enough to make small adjustments to margins or font to reduce the page length.


1

If it's part of the manuscript, you should include chapter titles and espcially epigraphs. It's not likely to be much, but anything that isn't front matter should be counted.


2

Agents are a rare breed. Agents can be picky. Even more picky, than publishing houses. Every agent has just a limited amount of time that he will be able to dedicate to new writers. He is trying to make sure, that his time is well spent and not wasted to an author, that is maybe hired by another agent the moment he starts to read his manuscript. I think ...


1

I definitely wouldn't send out the other book that contains the same characters. Rather, I would wait four weeks and then send out your original submission to someone else. The reasoning behind this is because the last time I submitted something it took a week just to travel across the country and arrive at the publishers office. You can safely assume that ...


1

You never MUST submit to someone who requests exclusive submissions, but once you've done it you should take it seriously. It would be surprisingly good fortune to have the two different books in your series accepted by different agents, but if it happened it could put you in a tough situation. Given that their window is only a month and a half, I would ...


-1

I've never worked with an agent, but I'd think the reason is obvious: An agent gets a commission on anything he manages to sell for a writer. If the writer uses multiple agents, than an agent could spend significant time trying to sell something this writer has produced, and then another agent sells it and collects the commission, and agent number one gets ...


5

Because evaluating an author's work is expensive. It consumes time that could otherwise be spent finding other authors. That time is a dead loss if the author signs with another agent. In the end this is a matter of power. While the agent does work for that author, there are more authors looking for agents than there are agents looking for authors, so the ...


1

I wouldn't count them, but word count is not any exact science. Publishers/agents want to know whether your book is 70.000 words vs 90.000 words; they don't care if it's 71982 instead of 72001


5

Yes, you can. For example, the time I published my first book I already had a number of people willing to buy my book and who weren't related to me or weren't close friends of mine. It was a non-fiction book for a small niche and I was already known in that niche. I participated in forum discussions, used a common IRC channel, I blogged and commented on ...



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