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The annex is a separate, standalone document, with information that supports your thesis, but is not part of the thesis.


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Well, I do not know what have you written in your thesis statement. However, I will give you some advice on how to do it better. First of all, if you need to comment the quote, then do not write what has been already written. Write your opinion and stick it to the end, providing a lot of good reasons for it. Your professor will like it. Also, it would be ...


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Putting section-titles will help give your summary structure so you can focus on summarizing different aspects in different subjects. Just remember that a summary is supposed to be short and very broad, using only relevant information.


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I would add another consideration when you are considering translation: copyright laws. Somewhat inconveniently, these vary from one jurisdiction to the other, so you will need to check that out. You may need to obtain the copyright holder's permission to translate something, depending on the length of the passage and the reason you are using it. In some ...


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Intellectual property transcends language.


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Well as most of the answers imply here, you should simply "cite" whatever that is not yours. What I mean by this is you should basically include references to snippets that you did not write and ones that you took from other sources. As long as you include proper citations, then you're on the safe side. (This basically refers to the idea of including a ...


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If you use someone else's ideas in an academic paper without giving them credit, that is plagiarism. If you have some hazy case and you're unsure, just give the original writer credit. It's easy to avoid committing plagiarism: just add a footnote. It's not that you can't use someone else's ideas. You just have to give the footnote. You don't need to give ...


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For your first question: This "translation" would likely be plagiarism. In academics, most researchers have a way to write and express ideas, independently of their writing language. Someone reading your paper, who is knowledgeable in your field (so most colleagues in your field), is likely to find the link between your 'translated ideas' from the original, ...


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You seem to be asking for permission to plagiarize. Don't. Cite all of your sources in your bibliography. It seems likely that your thesis advisor or chairperson explained this to you at some point. If you have more questions of this type, review the resources he or she gave you. Then, if it isn't covered, ask them in person.



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