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2

I agree that 2.0 is the standard - at least for Humanities PhD production and academic writing. It is assumed then that a piece of work can be printed and commented upon 'in the space' surrounding the text. Gutters and margins likewise are typically specified.


2

Are you in the United States or elsewhere? The United States colleges and universities favor a writing style called MLA or Modern Language Association -- they publish their own style guide which give extremely detailed instructions on how to format a paper for academic purposes. After undergraduate work, most people involved in writing default to their ...


1

In APA you can use et al for in-text citations IF the cited work has 6 or more authors. In fact, don't take my word for it. Read this article from the APA.


0

The simple answer is yes! The purpose of a reference is so that you can find a document where you got the source from. So unless Smith, K did two pieces with the same name, with different co-authors (on the same pages in the same journal!) then anyone interested is going to be able to find that document.


0

Well, I think the idea of "freewriting" is that you ignore typos and just keep throwing words at the screen. So the textbook answer is probably to ignore your typos. But in the long run, the question is surely, "What works for you?" When someone with more experience gives me advice about how to do a job, I generally try their advice at least once -- ...


1

You could make an audio recording instead of writing it down. If you have a smart phone you could use that. Alternatively, plug a microphone into your computer and use speech recognition software. Once you are sure it is working turn off the screen or put a piece of paper in front on it so that you can't be distracted by what you have already done.


3

Consider changing the medium! If you put pen to paper, literally, you eliminate the physical problems keyboarding presents and you should be free to freewrite to your heart's content. As an occupational therapist with an interest in this area, I would be most interested to learn how this approach works for you! (I'm also theorizing on the response if you had ...


6

Personally I can't concentrate if I leave bad spelling behind me. the solution to that for freewriting is to either go back and fix it (which isn't according to the 'rules' of freewriting) or write about the fact that you can't go back and fix what you've written until something else comes to mind. The concept of freewriting is to limber your mind up, if ...


0

Well, in in the International Baccalaureate Program's english classes, they tend to teach that when analysing the audience of a text - ('text' is synonymous to story in this case) - you have to ask a few questions to help one determine the audience: What is the purpose/moral of the story? (If any) Who is the author? (Anywhere from where they are from to ...


1

Find what you like to read. If you're not inspired by anything then stick to plumbing. Write something. Get all excited. Read a book of writing dos and donts. Revisit 2 Go to a live writers group. Even if you start by just listening you'll soon pick up lots of what does and doesn't work. Keep writing.


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Personally, I would suggest to start reading. That's what I found actually to be the best way to learn about different styles of writing, is to read samples of a particular writing style and see how they compare to other forms of writing. Like if you want to take up fantasy, head down to your local library and pick up a fantasy novel. Choosing the super ...


1

As long as you're not a computer, if you learned to speak, it was through imitation. Chances are, you learned to do a great many things through imitation. As Jamezrp said, find what you want to emulate, and do it. Don't worry too hard about what it is you're learning, or else you'll waste your mind on jargon and rhetoric, and never really get around to the ...



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