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I've been writing (and re-writing) something for a good number of years. In the development of the story, it kind of felt like I was finding myself. In this, I feel that the fantasy world I've created is having an effect on me philosophically. While this might be a good and a bad thing, it also dangerously blurs the line in my head and in my heart between reality and fantasy. I know this isn't a philosophy room, but I think this has happened to other authors too.

My question is:

Is this something that can be reversed, or am I better off leaving things as they are for the purpose of more writing in the same genre?

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Interesting dilemman, but this is really more of the start of a discussion than it is a question - and questions meant to spark discussion aren't allowed here, I'm afraid. Could you focus this into a specific question that can be answered without discussion? If not, we'll end up closing this. –  Neil Fein May 11 '12 at 2:53
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Oh, I'm sorry, I'll edit! –  Matthew Paul Chapdelaine May 11 '12 at 2:54
    
That's helpful, but perhaps we can focus this a little more: Are you literally confusing fiction with the reality of your everyday life? Are you having hallucinations? Are you experiencing confusion? Or is this strictly when trying to keep in all in your head when you're writing? (If the latter, I'd like to hear more about that.) –  Neil Fein May 11 '12 at 3:11
    
I've been having colorful dreams on this topic. And yes, I am experiencing confusion. I used to be a wiccan for some years, but this new way of thinking gradually replaced that religion almost entirely. –  Matthew Paul Chapdelaine May 11 '12 at 3:18
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Okay, based on the answers this is getting, there's really no way to answer this without a lot of speculation, since the question leaves much up to interpretation. I'm closing this now, but I'm willing to listen to arguments pro and con, and I'd love to hear suggestions about how to improve this question. –  Neil Fein May 11 '12 at 14:10
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closed as not constructive by Neil Fein May 11 '12 at 14:11

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2 Answers

There is an argument, I think, that we write what is inside of us - that is, we express into English some of our real, core beliefs.

The effect of expressing our beliefs, writing them out, can - in both good and bad ways - make them more real, more concrete, and so can affect our thinking even more. However, it is always good to get them out into the open, have them expressed, because otherwise we are, to an extent, repressing them. Writing is a fairly safe way of doing this.

So embrace an understand them, but make sure that you also challenge your own belief system, against reality. And dismiss the belief system when reality demonstrates it to be wrong. It will strengthen you as a person and a writer, the latter because your belief system as expressed in your writing will have a closer connection to reality. Yes, even if it is fantasy, it will engage better with the reality your readers know.

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If you're starting to believe that honesty isn't always the best policy, or something similar in nature, keep going. Writing is just channeling thought onto paper. Really, essentially, you've thought about an aspect of your world at length and come to regard it differently. The fact that you happened to be writing at the time has no bearing on the truth of this scenario. Asking whether it's a bad thing is practically the same as asking whether your personal world perspective is trending in a bad direction. Who can answer that but you?

If, on the other hand, you're beginning to think kitchen gnomes are cleaning your dishes at night...you might want to take a break.

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