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I'm writing an article about Microsoft for my tech' analysis website and I got into a stylistic roadblock.

Which of the following sentences should I use?

As I said before, the company from Redmond is cornered in the mobile space, so they'll need to heavily subsidize their OS in order to convince hardware manufacturers to join their fold.

As I said before, the Redmond company is cornered in the mobile space, so they'll need to heavily subsidize their OS in order to convince hardware manufacturers to join their fold.

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1  
Just call them Microsquish and be done with it. –  Gnawme Mar 6 '12 at 21:48
1  
I think in practice you'd be more likely to see "Redmond-based company" rather than plain "Redmond company". –  FumbleFingers Mar 6 '12 at 22:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"In English, attributive adjectives usually precede their nouns in simple phrases" source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjective

That seems a fairly simple phrase so I would suggest "the Redmond company".

Also, given the familiarity of the company it is not some company from Redmond, it is the Redmond company.

It seems unnecessary and a little too informal to say "as I said before". If you have the readers attention they will know what you have already said.

How about:

"The Redmond company is finding itself cornered in the mobile space, ..."

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Thank you. This is a convincing argument. –  Axonn Mar 6 '12 at 22:33

It's "the Redmond-based company." There is no value in making the phrase longer.

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So... provided that the reader has already been informed that they are reading about Microsoft, I prefer the first one (the company from Redmond). It's nearly pejorative or at least tongue-in-cheek, and the phrasing reminds me of The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The second version (the Redmond company) isn't confusing per se, but it won't scan with the impact of the first version.

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I prefer "the company from Redmond" as well. As Sean notes above, it is the company from Redmond, and this also eliminates even the least confusion that you somehow might be talking about some other company which happens to be named "Redmond." –  Lauren Ipsum Mar 8 '12 at 12:49

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