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I'm searching for a tool/strategy to do the following:

  • I have a lot of text snippets (informations) which are available for creating a document in different variants.
  • The document has a standard structure - so some parts will always be included for all variants, while others are optional.

My question is how to organize those optional informations, to be able to

  • have an overview which information is "available"
  • see which information was already used in the actual variant of my document
  • store tagging information with those text snippets, because some are interesting for special target audiences

If this all sounds weird to you:

The document I want to create is a curriculum vitae with additional information about the working experience I've made. As I have a lot of very diverse experience, I have collected every information to avoid forgetting anything which might be relevant for a job application.

However, this is too much information, so for each job application I only want to add the really relevant information and so I'd like to

  • collect all the information snippets separately
  • tag them for different target groups, so that I can easily get an overview about the experience relevant to the job, I'm applying to and then can add it to my CV and see which information I have already used.

Is there a tool that could help me? I'm writing my CV etc. with LaTeX and at the beginning I thought I'd be able just to remove certain parts of the text by adding comments, but the source code gets confusing very quickly..

I nearly forgot to mention: I'm working on MacOS X 10.6

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This may actually be a better question for SuperUser, although it is possibly on-topic here. –  justkt Oct 14 '11 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

You could actually do this in Scrivener, if you break your jobs into individual Scrivener documents, use the Keywords function to tag each one, and then Compile in various combinations. I haven't used the Compile function a lot, but it's worth experimenting with.

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Two times on one day. Every other person I would have flagged ;) –  John Smithers Oct 14 '11 at 19:45
    
I haven't mentioned my favorite program in months. I'm behind. :D –  Lauren Ipsum Oct 14 '11 at 20:29

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